Commercial Usage

Hello!

I have a product that i am working on. The Arduino nano works seamlessly with our product but we don't like the way the board is designed and the power connector. So my question is, Can I redesign the board using the original schematics and use it? Or do i have to do something else? For reference, the board will be integrated with other custom boards and will only be used to drive some sensors.

Thanks!

Is there some overriding reason you cannot design a single board to do all the functions? Certainly would be cheaper to manufacture.

Paul

Yeah, our design has a projector and we need a controller board for it. On top of that we need a computer that can run and OS plus sensors. We want to make our product as small as possible so stacking these boards on top of each other would be more space-efficient. We don't see a way to have one microcomputer sun all of these things (especially the projector b/c it requires a different controller) So to reiterate, it would be super nice if we could design the board that runs everything but its not space-efficient. Just so you know, we aren't in the manufacturing stage yet (still prototyping).

Thanks,

The Nano incorporates a USB interface. Is that a requirement for your design? Generally, you would be looking at the Pro Mini as a basic module.

We took a look at the pro mini and it seems as though that is a good option but when integrating the board into our product do we have to say anything or do anything? I recognize that Arduino is open-sourced. So the question is:

Can we redesign Arduino Nano, Pro Mini (while keeping the main design the same) and use it however we want? For example, We redesign the Nano and integrate it and now use it without doing anything?

https://www.arduino.cc/en/Main/FAQ#toc10

Also, in general, legal protection for electronic designs is extremely weak. That is why so many manufacturers resort to sanding off the tops of IC's and similar ploys.

Thanks! So since i am integrating the board along with some other components i don't have to do anything. (Physically embedding an Arduino board inside a commercial product does not require you to disclose or open-source any information about its design.)

sanjeet_k:
Thanks! So since i am integrating the board along with some other components i don't have to do anything. (Physically embedding an Arduino board inside a commercial product does not require you to disclose or open-source any information about its design.)

That would be only true of an actual Arduino produced board, I think. Not a derived board. Look at the paragraph following that one.

would it me simpler to design a PCB with a socket for a daughter board which can take a Pro Mini?
you could then provide it with a good quality power supply from the motherboard

aarg:
That would be only true of an actual Arduino produced board, I think. Not a derived board. Look at the paragraph following that one.

The logic there is clear. The Arduino organisation does not/ can not prevent imitations - "clones" - of its circuits being manufactured and sold, so neither would it affect you doing just that. There is a concern about copyright of the Arduino name being applied to such clones.

Now there are licensing and copyright considerations regarding selling the firmware derived from the Arduino IDE and its incorporated libraries, which is another matter.

horace:
would it me simpler to design a PCB with a socket for a daughter board which can take a Pro Mini?

This is always a very sensible approach to low-volume production.

The worst that could happen is that some customer might complain that you haven’t obeyed the “share alike” clause of the Arduino OSHW design, and you’d have to make your design “open source” (perhaps a good reason for keeping it as a separate board.) OTOH, that clause seems to be widely disobeyed, and in fact most of the Arduino boards are so trivial that attaching a license to them at all is a bit like that time that UCB tried to put a copyright header on the “false” shell script…

Paul__B:
The logic there is clear. The Arduino organisation does not/ can not prevent imitations - "clones" - of its circuits being manufactured and sold, so neither would it affect you doing just that. There is a concern about copyright of the Arduino name being applied to such clones.

Now there are licensing and copyright considerations regarding selling the firmware derived from the Arduino IDE and its incorporated libraries, which is another matter.
This is always a very sensible approach to low-volume production.

Well, I mis-read it, actually that section is about releasing the modified Eagle board files. The implication is that you must make the modified board files available. It's not clear whether that applies only to your customers, or whether it has to be public. Maybe that information is in the license. Obviously making it public covers both. Nothing is said in that section about the Arduino name.

Honestly, there is so little going on on the average board, that it seems pointless to me, not to just embed the processor in your PCB design. I'm sure there is ample documentation from Microchip about how to do that.

Thanks everyone! I think i'll just go with designing a new board since any way we have to make changes to the Arduino.

Thanks!!!

sanjeet_k:
Thanks everyone! I think i'll just go with designing a new board since any way we have to make changes to the Arduino.

Thanks!!!

Be sure your design can stand up to the vibration in your aircraft.

Paul

it seems you can copy the hardware without any concerns. you do not have to use the Eagle files, you can make your own. there are lots of schematics of the Arduino UNO and even some improvements. all without royalties, without license and without you having to release your schematic.

The big concern is software and libraries. Many of the popular libraries are free to use for hobbiests, but are not free for commercial use.

if you are making a few hundred boards, I would think a letter stating your intent to the copyright holder would gain you permission, or some agreement for use.