Commercial use of Arduino

Hi,

I'm very new to Arduino, and working with microcontrollers all together. I have read about Arduino in a magazine, and decided to check out this technology. Since then, I have ordered my first Arduino, and started learning how to program, and control stuff with Arduino. Currently I'm just playing around with LEDs, trying to learn the basics. However, while I was reading some reviews and going through some examples, a question came to my mind, whether Arduino is being used commercially, or is this platform mainly used for prototyping? Are there any commercial projects built based on Arduino platform? I apologise if this is posted in the wrong forum... I wasn't sure where this question should belong :)

Thanks, Jerry

I was gonna nag at you there, til you saved yourself :) This would probably best fit in Barsport.

Either way,

It COULD be possible, but I doubt it, arduino is meant fro prototyping, and if one were to use it commercially, depending on scale, the code/circuit would be modified to fit on a custom chip/set of chips.

At the very least, use an actual arduino to program ATMega-164's then plug them into custom circuits without the headers or FTDI USB-Serial converter, that would shave the cost while retaining functions.

In any case, if you plan to have a product commercialy available, you'll have to check with massimo and all the guys behind the arduino. I think they'll deserve some "royalties" of any kind. But if you are going to mass produce you stuff, you'll certainly have to rewrite your program from scratch in order to have it fitted for mass chip burning (not sure about that, maybe you can have a dump of your sketch + the bootloader directly burned in factory). Anyway, this series of article is great : http://www.bunniestudios.com/blog/?cat=7

But if you are going to mass produce you stuff, you'll certainly have to rewrite your program from scratch in order to have it fitted for mass chip burning (not sure about that, maybe you can have a dump of your sketch + the bootloader directly burned in factory).

You can use the ICSP header to directly program a sketch without the bootloader.

Cool... Thanks for your replies. I'm not planning to use it commercially, I was just thinking about the limitations of Arduino compared to something that is used commercially. I wasn't sure why I haven't seen commercial projects built based on Arduino. :)

The Arduino isn't really designed to be the core of a commercial product, and it's not produced/sold in high enough volumes for it to be priced in a way that would make it an attractive component of a commercial design. If you can get a reel/tray of mega168s for around $2 per IC and a custom, compact PCB for a few dollars per board, your commercial product will be much more competitively priced than if you spend $40 or $50 for an Arduino and then have to hand-solder your design-specific components to it. Arduinos really shine in that they make it easy for hobbyists to create great microcontroller-based projects without needing access to pick-and-place machines and reflow ovens. They're a great, inexpensive prototyping platform where you can refine your ideas and demonstrate how things will work. Once that's done, if you're serious about making a commercial product that sells 1000+ units per year, you're going to want to use a custom PCB that includes only the components your design requires.

  • Ben

you coul always use the atmega168 as an atmega168 and just burn programs and such starit onto the chip... no arduino neccesary

Can you burn an arduino sketch on a mega168 without the bootloader ? (assuming you have the material)

Yes.