communist, or capitalist... (china) and other thoughts

just a thought, for a communist country, china sure has a bunch of people capitalizing on eBay.

And while i am on that thought, all the electronics stuff i bought from china off eBay, suppose it is surplus, bootleg, or "fell off the truck"? i hope it is all just surplus... :o

~Travis

They converted from communism to an authoritarian government with capitalist economy. Apparently it is pretty successful. Successful enough for them to buy Walmart and re-name the chain Great Wallmart. Have the stores in your town been renamed yet?

Hi
Why are all the "Peoples Democratic Republic of" not???????

Tom... :slight_smile:

TomGeorge:
Hi
Why are all the "Peoples Democratic Republic of" not???????

Tom... :slight_smile:

Marketing is everything...

Travis,

China is capitalist economy, if you meant the country, not the plates, bowls, or cups. You have no idea that a huge amount of electronic components and complete products have been manufactured there for a longer time than Arduino? Parts are cheapest at the source. Labor is not prohibitively expensive. Factories line up a whole city's streets (figuratively) so manufacturing boards and assembling them is cheapest and scale-able as well. What you bought were meant to be sold to you. Quality-wise, I don't know how much each of these thousands of factories will check. Most of them don't put their names on the board. That tells you something about their QA. What I DON'T understand is why certain parts are so cheap that a whole assembled board is sold cheaper than the US price of one component on the board.

Don't expect things from China to be cheap forever. Soon they will be just as dear as equivalent US or European manufactured products.

But by then the west will have lost the ability to make equivalent products so the Chinese (and Indian) suppliers will be able to make fat profits at our expense.

...R

Yes, it will be interesting to see how long that will take. Perhaps another 20 years? Countries that are building up their industrial complex need to reach a point where pollution is a serious problem for themselves, before they react to it and make their laws such that they can't manufacture anything any more without meeting stringent and expensive guidelines. That is the point where getting somebody else to pollute their own backyard to make cool stuff for us becomes attractive.

The name of China's political party is the Communist Party, but Communism has evolved quite a bit since what USA schools were teaching us about it in the 70's and 80's (not that the teaching at that time was accurate). Wikipedia has some interesting things to say about the party:

The official explanation for China's economic reforms is that the country is in the primary stage of socialism, a developmental stage similar to the capitalist mode of production. The planned economy established under Mao Zedong was replaced by the socialist market economy, the current economic system, on the basis that "Practice is the Sole Criterion for the Truth" (i.e. the planned economy was deemed inefficient).

dmjlambert:
Countries that are building up their industrial complex need to reach a point where pollution is a serious problem for themselves, before they react to it

I don't think people care about pollution or other aspects of safety until they are rich enough to afford it. Anti-pollution and health-and-safety laws are a luxury.

...R

Robin2:
Don't expect things from China to be cheap forever. Soon they will be just as dear as equivalent US or European manufactured products.

But by then the west will have lost the ability to make equivalent products so the Chinese (and Indian) suppliers will be able to make fat profits at our expense.

...R

It took Japan maybe 10 years to become not cheap enough? Later it was Taiwan. But these countries/territories are small in nature. It would take some time before China goes down the same route. Manufacturing is already moving into cheaper countries such as Vietnam. When average income goes up from 1/4 that of a western country to maybe about 1/2 of that, companies may just uproot and move. What the west has but the east doesn't is the silicon technology. You can turn a piece of worthless silicon into priceless products. You trade it for lots of resources with the poor countries. I don't think this technological gap is closing in 10-20 years. Chinese are making chips but there is that tech gap. Indians are doing a lot of IT but likely not doing enough hardware. They will have to start making lots of tech (hardware) in order to really catch up. Right now, serious chip technology is mostly held by US. Sensor technology probably Japan and Germany.

Weird tangent, but isn't it weird that China has 1 time zone?

Mazza99:
Weird tangent, but isn't it weird that China has 1 time zone?

Do they have DayLight Saving?

TomGeorge:
Do they have DayLight Saving?

Gawd no! Tried that for a couple of years in the 90s. Folks were confused and generally angry at the non-sense.
In the western part, people just go to work at 6am or 7am while in Beijing they do 8:30am or 9am. Not a problem with a single time zone. Most people are at work during the same time period of a day. If you live in the US on the east coast, you make a call to tech support on the west coast right after your early lunch. There is no support in the whole morning. It's not great!

Hi,
In Australia, during NON Daylight Savings, we have 3 time zones.
Tas, Vic, NSW, Qld, Eastern Australian Time
1/2 hr behind them we have;
NT, SA, Central Australian Time.
1 1/2 h behind them we have;
WA, Western Australian Time.

When Daylight Saving kicks in we have;
QLD Eastern Australian Time.
1 hr Ahead of them we have;
NSW, Vic, TAS Eastern Australian Daylight Saving Time
1/2 behind them we have;
SA, Central Australian Daylight Saving Time
1 hr behind them we have;
NT Central Australian Time
2 1/2 hr behind SA we have;
WA Western Australian Time

Map for daylight saving in Australia;
TZ.jpg
Sorry missed Eucla Western Central Time 1 3/4 hr behind SA.

Tom… :o

I love that mapping. I wish we had some complicated stuff like that. Who says separation of time zones needs to be on the whole hour only? Boring ol' USA, that's who.

Up until 1963, if you went by rail from Melbourne Victoria to Sydney NSW, you had to change trains at the state border.
Victoria had Broad Guage, 5ft 3inches.
NSW had Standard Guage 4ft 8 1/2 inches.

Its only been about 15 years that you can take a standard guage train from Brisbane QLD all the way through NSW, VIC, SA, to Perth WA.
They take a special run of the Indian Pacific that normally runs from Sydney to Perth, directly across the country.

Ya learn sumfin about the best country in the world every day.

Tom...

travis_farmer:
Why not just use multi-gauge tracks?

Far less confusing :wink:

~Travis

They did between Melbourne and Sydney, and the other updates, but it takes politicians and money to do...
Tom... :slight_smile:
Although most conversion was just new sleepers and move a rail.

travis_farmer:
who needs a time machine, when you can just drive around Australia :o

~Travis

If you drive clock-wise. Wait, maybe counter-clockwise. Ah, that doesn't work. Figure 8 with clockwise top loop? :smiley:

Hi,
It seems there is a direction to drive around Australia.

http://caravanandmotorhomebooks.com/best-way-to-drive-around-australia/

Tom... :slight_smile:

If you get down to REALLY BASIC maths, if travelling on the same highway, and lane centres are 3m apart, travelling clockwise and travelling anti-clockwise should differ by 2 x pi x 3 = 18.84m (methodology is full of holes of course but so are our roads :slight_smile: )

travis_farmer:
Why not just use multi-gauge tracks?

Far less confusing :wink:

~Travis

Where the heck is that? Looks like there are at least 5 different gauges there. The widest one looks like Brunel's 7ft gauge.