Complete Noob Making a Core Body Temperature Sensor

Hey,

I'm a total newbie to anything hardware related, but I need to make an in-ear core body temperature sensor for a research project I am working on. I need a sensor such as a thermocouple to be connected to an Arduino.
The thermocouple goes in my ear, gets the temperature and then reports the value to the Arduino which can then (possibly) give it to a cellphone / computer that saves it as a flat file. Or possibly, the arduino can save in its own memory from where it can be read from.

How do I exactly do this? Is there any tutorial that anyone can point me to? I will need some sensors as well, so can someone please direct me to some great sensor to get my job done?

Thanks a lot guys... Sorry if this is too vague / simple a question, but that's only because I please complete ignorance in the subject!

You should not put a thermocouple in your ear. It is not safe.
A thermocouple is also not accurate.

An infrared thermometer can be used, like this one:

Or is it possible to stick a temperature sensor to the armpit or on the belly ?

Thanks a lot for replying. Yeah I could definitely use the infrared sensor. The device has to measure core body temperature which is different in the ear than the armpit. Can I connect the sensor you showed me to an arduino and then have it send the readings to some portable device? Any tutorial for that?

For the data sending to a portable device it depends on what range you are looking for. For relatively short distances you may want to try blue tooth. A good tutorial would be this http://arduinobasics.blogspot.com/2013/01/arduino-basics-bluetooth-tutorial.html this will require you to write a program for the phone to make it work though, or you can make the portable device yourself and use rf which is cheap and simple http://www.pjrc.com/teensy/td_libs_VirtualWire.html as for long distance you may have to try gsm, but that expensive quickly.

I am in agreement with Ervin about the use of IR, easier, non-contact IR.

But, for the record,

A thermocouple is also not accurate.

is somewhat too broad, IMO. Thermocouples are very accurate since they are based on fundamental physics. However, to achieve this intrinsic accuracy requires pure metals, precision wiring practices, and high quality transconductance (instrumentation) amplifiers, and a decent cold junction reference... All which make a quality thermocouple solution expensive.

The late Peter Anderson has a sketch on using the 90614 with Arduino, but you likely will find something more recent.
http://www.phanderson.com/picaxe/mlx90614.html

Ray