component protection for flame solder

i want a little mosfet/capacitor/standard inductor size clamping arm made of non magnetic non conductive material that is keeps what ever it is got hold of at a safe temp while using a little hand held butane torch to solder pre-positioned joins. does anyone know a guy/girl that has designed one of these and sells these?

Non conducting materials normally are poor conductors of heat.

You can make your own clamp on heat sinks by joining copper or aluminium to the jaws of alligator clips.

Weedpharma

arduidiot: i want a little mosfet/capacitor/standard inductor size clamping arm made of non magnetic non conductive material that is keeps what ever it is got hold of at a safe temp while using a little hand held butane torch to solder pre-positioned joins. does anyone know a guy/girl that has designed one of these and sells these?

Why must it be non magnetic and non conducting?

A simply alligator clip or needle nose pliers are typically used to hold a heat sensitive part and protect it during soldering.

Hi,

www.wiltronics.com.au/catalogue/523/electronic-components-and-parts/heatsinks/heatsink-pliers

Why a butane torch, I know you can get very small ones, I have one for in the field heatshrink work. I use a butane powered soldering iron, no exposed flame or heat. Or is the OP overthinking AGAIN? Tom..... :)

ok all very good points haha tom not over thinking is the part that requires the most thinking :slightly_frowning_face:

ok firstly why the butane torch and not the soldering iron?

i am working on attempting a system that allows designers to photograph a circuit they have designed on a blank PCB, and when the image file is selected & loaded in a java based application the individual components have been identified by a pixel scanner ( their geometry on the board only, not the exact part number YET!) the user is prompted to select how those components are to be joined when soldered.

In terms of the hardware requirements of the robotics as if the miniture butane torch on the robotic arm is more efficient energy wise in that the soldering irons have alot of current draw, require to much time to heat up, end up looking like the bad guy from T2 just took a dump after 6 months, and i hate them for burning me every time i have the hand shakes. which is alot.

Just easier for a miniture butane powered soldering iron )now that i know they exist :-P) is going to be faster, and the user is going to have to restock it'[s refil container that the mini (will automatically connect with when not in use) solder so hey add butane its as cheap as chips

in terms of non-magnetic and non conducting that was just a brain fail.

i obviously got mixed up and thought i was using radio 433 MHz for the proximity sensing but ultrasonic is heaps better for this range of distance so it can be made of anything, i was thinking of making a refrigeration unit to draw the arm shielding for example the body of the mosfet as its legs are being soldered. i thought that if the direct butane flame is aimed at the point of solder given this set up it would be forced to weld the desired join since everything else surrounding it cant peak up to the melting point? hmmm hence my request for help i guess.

arduidiot:
In terms of the hardware requirements of the robotics as if the miniture butane torch on the robotic arm is more efficient energy wise in that the soldering irons have alot of current draw

This only matters if you aren’t close to a wall outlet - and honestly, not even that much. A 15 watt iron running at 24 volts (thereabouts for a well-made temp-controlled iron - like a Hakko) should be around a half-amp of current for the output side, much less than that on the input (I surmise, anyhow - never measured it).

arduidiot:
, require to much time to heat up,

Again - a quality temp-controlled iron will only take seconds to heat up (I have an old Hakko SMT cartridge-tip iron that takes maybe 15 seconds to go from 0 to full temp).

arduidiot:
end up looking like the bad guy from T2 just took a dump after 6 months,

Not exactly sure what you mean by this, but if you’re running through even cheapo soldering irons this quickly - it isn’t the iron.

arduidiot:
and i hate them for burning me every time i have the hand shakes. which is alot.

Well - no soldering iron is going to cure that issue. Something hot is going to stay hot for a bit, regardless of how it is heated.

You might look into micro spot-welding systems - but I’m not even sure such things exist (with the exception of specialized systems ($$$) for adding tabs to rechargeable batteries.

arduidiot:
Just easier for a miniture butane powered soldering iron )now that i know they exist

Have you thought about hot-air and/or IR systems? I can tell you that a butane torch, no matter how small, is going to do nothing but burn the PCB - long before the solder melts. That SMT iron I was talking about has tips meant for such rework - fairly thin, almost like needles. Something like that might be best. Otherwise, for point precision you’re probably going to have to look at systems that cost a sizable amount of money - if they exist at all.

arduidiot:
refrigeration unit to draw the arm shielding for example the body of the mosfet as its legs are being soldered. i thought that if the direct butane flame is aimed at the point of solder given this set up it would be forced to weld the desired join since everything else surrounding it cant peak up to the melting point?

The way you keep heat flow down (depending on the part - sometimes a heatsink is the only way) is by being quick with your soldering, and jumping from part to part to avoid heating up any single local area or part too much. Also - how do you plan on moving and positioning this heatsink around as well? Are we talking thru-hole, smt, both?

I think maybe you need to give some more thought to your idea (not saying it’s a bad one - sounds almost like a da-vinci system for electronics work) - and a bit more research.

One assumes he's doing throughhole, since an existing and much simpler solution exists to automate soldering of SMT parts (reflow oven made from toaster oven - I use the ControLeo2 arduino leonardo compatible controller and build kit)...

If you've got both on a board, you reflow the SMD's, then solder the throughhole parts by painfully soldering them by hand (though through-hole pin header can be reflowed by putting some solder paste onto the ends of the pins. Less painful than hand solder). Presumably that's what this project is aimed at making less painful (though, that said, there aren't many parts that have to be through-hole - I avoid through-hole like the plague when I'm making the boards at home, because drilling is such a bitch)

And yeah, butane torch is no good for soldering - There's no temperature control! You'd scorch the board on small parts, or fail to melt the solder on big ones, or both. How do you light it? (have you ever tried to electronically light a gas mixture? It only happens when you don't want it to. Hell, we use the kind of torches I think you're talking about for fireworks every season, and we see annual failure rates of close to 50%, every single year, due to the sparker not igniting it; it still makes a spark, but the spark mysteriously fails to light the torch)

It sounds like you have an antipathy towards soldering irons bred of your own inability to solder, and frustrations endured during your attempts - the solution to this is to improve your soldering skills, and makes sure you're using a decent temperature controlled soldering iron. It makes a world of difference - I use a Weller that's older than I am, and it still works great and looks fine, other than the ugly color weller used for the case...