confusing | || & && ~ ^ new ideas

Hello.
I have an idea that I would like to share with you.
I’m used to the visual basic language, and the logical operators are a bit confusing.
Tell me what you think

#define or ||
#define and &&
#define not !
#define b_or |
#define b_and &
#define b_not ~
#define b_xor ^

I think it could be implemented.
Visual is easier than the operand, is not it?
:wink:

You assume such things do not already exist.

https://www.google.com/search?q=c%2B%2B+alternative+logical+operators

Hi, Check this Arduino Reference page;

https://www.arduino.cc/en/Reference/HomePage

Tom... :)

Or you could just get used to it. One benefit of doing that is that you will be able to read other people’s code, including the millions of lines of C and C++ already in place out there in the world. Another benefit is that other people will be able to read your code without having to keep in mind your special little redefinitions. A final benefit is that your code will not look like it was written by a BASIC programmer, which is always a good move.

But if you are keen to do this, another common set of definitions is

#define BEGIN {
#define END ; }
#define WHILE while(
#define DO ) 

...
  WHILE foo() == 2 DO
  BEGIN
    bar();
    baz();
    quux()
  END

@Paul: I remember seeing this back in the days of Turbo Pascal. Some people were trying to migrate from Turbo Pascal to C and they used such things to create a “warm, fuzzy” feeling for the Pascal people. I think you’re right: Throw the crutches away and just use what’s provided by the language’s syntax rules.

PaulMurrayCbr: Or you could just get used to it. One benefit of doing that is that you will be able to read other people's code, including the millions of lines of C and C++ already in place out there in the world.

I agree.

We might like to turn back the clock and give the original language developers a slap on the knuckles for attempting to use meaningless symbols rather than meaningful names.

But "improving" the language now is more likely to add to the confusion rather than to reduce it.

...R