Connect Arduino to 220v powersupply

Hi,

I want to create a small device to turn on and off a simple lamp using an infrared remote control. Just, because I can. I got it all working (using this link: http://www.circuitbasics.com/setting-up-a-5v-relay-on-the-arduino/), but the Arduino still needs its own power supply.

The question is: Can I use the power coming from the socket to turn on the Arduino (nano)? If not: what do I need to turn on the Arduino with the same power source as the lamp? Links are welcome too :slight_smile:

Thanks!

johanf82:
Hi,

I want to create a small device to turn on and off a simple lamp using an infrared remote control. Just, because I can. I got it all working (using this link: http://www.circuitbasics.com/setting-up-a-5v-relay-on-the-arduino/), but the Arduino still needs its own power supply.

The question is: Can I use the power coming from the socket to turn on the Arduino (nano)? If not: what do I need to turn on the Arduino with the same power source as the lamp? Links are welcome too :slight_smile:

Thanks!

You need a Power supply that can deliever 5V and 500-1000mA.

Yes but not directly. I do this a lot but I simply use a wall mounted brick, looks like a cell phone charger. They are readily available and surprisingly reliable. They come with a plug that mates directly to the arduino. I like to use 10V units but the 12V works just great.

Two things first be sure the output is regulated and it will supply at least 500mA. Mine are typically 2000mA.
Have Fun,
Gil

gilshultz:
Yes but not directly. I do this a lot but I simply use a wall mounted brick, looks like a cell phone charger. They are readily available and surprisingly reliable. They come with a plug that mates directly to the arduino. I like to use 10V units but the 12V works just great.

Two things first be sure the output is regulated and it will supply at least 500mA. Mine are typically 2000mA.
Have Fun,
Gil

But if you have the possibility to choose between power supply I would choose a 5v unit to be able to bypass the inneficient and with extremely low current capabilities on board regulator.

It's useless to have a 2000mA PSU if your voltage regulator can only output a couple hundred miliamps. Supposing you won't 12v anywhere on your circuit, obviously.