Control 230v AC with MOSFETs

Hello, recently i designed a board with Arduino to control my house water cooler (I dont know the right name for it in English ill put picture of it below), first i wanted to use relays for it, but then i found several problems such as electromagnetic field that they make when their turned ON (this actually caused me problems in my last projects) or their price, because the motor of my cooler need about 10A to run and high current relays are about 20$ for each here.
so i decided to use MOSFETs and there’s another problems, the most important is that the wires i have in control wall key that i use now, are 4 wires, a phase wire and 3 wires for pump, motor, and speed. each will work if the phase is connected to them like if phase is connected to pump wire, the pump will turn on.
if i wanted to use relay for it, it would be like picture 1 below.(edit: i connected the relay NC to the wires, that’s wrong, just forget about that i wanted to give you an idea about how it works)

and if i want to use MOSFETS, MY plan is to connect them like picture 2.

Now my question is will it work like this? or should i change the design?

Water cooler.jpg

No, don't do that. You need a mains rated relay of some sort, either mechanical or solid-state (SSR), and you'll
probably need a snubber circuit for the motor side to reduce arcing.

If driving a mechanical relay you cannot do it straight from an Arduino pin at all. You need a transistor
or MOSFET to boost the current, and a free-wheel diode across the relay winding to stop inductive kick-back,
this should all be easy to find if you google "Arduino relay driver circuit". There are modules available with
opto-isolated relay drivers and relays, although high current versions may be hard to find.

Note that direct connection to the mains is unsafe and usually illegal unless the circuit connected to the mains is
double-insulated. A MOSFET cannot handle AC at all, strictly DC, and provides no isolation, whereas a mains-rated
relay does.

BTW the turn-on current surge from your motor is going to happen however you switch it. Its good practice to keep high power circuitry well away from sensitive low-voltage circuitry to reduce the risk
of interference.

MarkT:
No, don’t do that. You need a mains rated relay of some sort, either mechanical or solid-state (SSR), and you’ll
probably need a snubber circuit for the motor side to reduce arcing.

If driving a mechanical relay you cannot do it straight from an Arduino pin at all. You need a transistor
or MOSFET to boost the current, and a free-wheel diode across the relay winding to stop inductive kick-back,
this should all be easy to find if you google “Arduino relay driver circuit”. There are modules available with
opto-isolated relay drivers and relays, although high current versions may be hard to find.

Note that direct connection to the mains is unsafe and usually illegal unless the circuit connected to the mains is
double-insulated. A MOSFET cannot handle AC at all, strictly DC, and provides no isolation, whereas a mains-rated
relay does.

BTW the turn-on current surge from your motor is going to happen however you switch it. Its good practice to keep high power circuitry well away from sensitive low-voltage circuitry to reduce the risk
of interference.

Oh… so you mean i cant use mosfets at all?
and about what you said about keeping high voltage thing away from low voltage parts, my actual problem with relays is just that, i should put them all together in a box and i should make the box as small as possible because its on the wall and everyone will see that all the time, and i don’t really want a huge peace of plastic on my house wall… that’s why i thought about mosfets.

Trying to miniaturize mains equipment isn't a great idea, you need all the clearance and creepage distances,
thermal management and EMI is an issue that needs addressing. An SSR is internally a circuit using MOSFETs
(two, one for each half-cycle), and a special type of opto-isolator that can drive MOSFET gates, plus heatsink,
insulation, protection circuitry and probably some snubbing too.

Get a UL rated SSR perhaps? All the safety testing and engineering is done for you.

There are also wirelessly controlled wall-mount switches/relays that might be useful.

MarkT:
Trying to miniaturize mains equipment isn't a great idea, you need all the clearance and creepage distances,
thermal management and EMI is an issue that needs addressing. An SSR is internally a circuit using MOSFETs
(two, one for each half-cycle), and a special type of opto-isolator that can drive MOSFET gates, plus heatsink,
insulation, protection circuitry and probably some snubbing too.

Get a UL rated SSR perhaps? All the safety testing and engineering is done for you.

There are also wirelessly controlled wall-mount switches/relays that might be useful.

I cant use SSRs because i'm trying to make the project cheap as possible, a single phase SSR is about 100$ here! i know its stupid... my country is under heavy sanctions that's why the prices are so freaked. so we have this budget issues in everything, anyway, i guess i should try the relays whatsoever.

and about the pre-maded switches, yes they are good, but you know... i just wanna make this project all done by myself, so... they'r not the choice. the prototype is completed and its use a uln2803 for driving relays just wanted to make sure if there is another way, and well both another ways seems to be blocked XD

anyway thanks for fast responds, i guess i got my answer, thank you!