Control of multi-part project

Hello everyone I'm new to arduino :) I am now creating a project with about 30 motors (servo + steps), 8 electromagnetic sensors, a screen, several LEDs, and a buzzer. My question is which boards and parts I need to control all of this, and how I manage it in terms of power supply.

Thanks in advance

A Mega (Atmega2560 based board) can control up to 48 servos. Plan for each servo to need about an amp. Stepper motors needs a stepper motor controller to create the higher current pulses that make the motor stop. Each stepper motor controller will usually need a Direction and a Step pin at a minimum. You can check then out at Pololu.com Stepper motors will also need an amp or more, depending on the motor. LEDs, those just need an IO pin and a current limit resistor for the typical 5mm single color LED. Same for a buzzer. Electromagnetic sensor, is that a reed relay that closes when a magnet passes it? Please clarify. One input needed for each if so. Screen, find one with an I2C interface, only 2 pins are needed. There are 2 pins on the Mega dedicated for I2C (SCL and SDA). If you go with a largeer screen, then an SPI interface will be faster. That will connect to 4 dedicated pins, SCK, MOSI, MISO, and SS. A Mega has 70 IO digital IO pins available; 16 of them can also do analog input. Doesn't sound like you need analog inputs tho. Sparkfun.com and Adafruit.com are also good sources.

Power supply: you may need to acquire several 10A power supplies to power the various motors. All Grounds will need to connect together and also connect to the Arduino Ground to have a common reference. One 10A motor might supply 10 servos for example, with 10 control signals coming from the Mega. MPJA.com has a lot of supplies available, in different voltage and current ratings. Hard to recommend past that without knowing more about your servos and stepper motors.

Good luck!

These links may help.

Stepper Motor Basics Simple Stepper Code

...R

Hi, Welcome to the forum.

Please read the first post in any forum entitled how to use this forum. http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php/topic,148850.0.html .

Can you tell us your electronics, programming, arduino, hardware experience?

Thanks.. Tom.. :)

[quote author=avibar link=msg=4253742 date=1564094424]
I'm new to Barduino  :)

Sure, you haven't even got the name correct yet... And yet such an ambitious project:

I am now creating a project with about 30 motors (servo + steps), 8 electromagnetic sensors, a screen, several LEDs, and a buzzer.

How many steppers? What is their rated current? Which stepper drivers are you looking at? How many servos? What is their rated voltage and current? What type of screen? What electromagnetic sensors? How many LEDs? What's the rated voltage and current of the buzzer?

Hello again Following a change in the program I return with the question again, and this time in an orderly fashion

The project includes 18 * Servo Motor MG995 360 Degree 12 * LED Lights (Standard) 1 * IIC / I2C 1602 LCD screen

I'd love to get help, what board I need, a power supply, amplifiers or anything else Thank you

@wvmarle Nice that you noticed a spelling mistake ... but it's a Google translation mistake, not my ...

Maybe if you can say WHY that you think you can do this in some amount of time?

Usually beginners are trying to learn how to code, for some it takes a bit of waking up from their wild dreams.

avibar: 18 * Servo Motor MG995 360 Degree

That's going to need a serious power supply (1.2A stall x 18 = 21.6A at 6V - if you don't load them you can get away with a smaller supply).

To control them all, a servo extension board would be a good idea.

12 * LED Lights (Standard)

Please give your definition of "standard" in terms of current/voltage requirements.

@wvmarle Nice that you noticed a spelling mistake ... but it's a Google translation mistake, not my ...

Your proofreading mistake then. Making such little errors spells disaster when you start programming.

avibar: Hello again Following a change in the program I return with the question again, and this time in an orderly fashion

Start by getting yourself an Uno and learning (as three separate short programs)

  • how to control 1 servo
  • how to connect to and control 1 external LED
  • how to display "Hello World" on the LCD screen.

When you can do those simple tasks you will be much better prepared for the design and implementation of your bigger project.

...R

Hi Thanks for the comments 1. I am a professional programmer, and coding doesn't scare me ... 2. I've already done the simple tasks with individual components, and also what @Robin2 wrote

What I lack is the knowledge how to control everyone when they are connected together It should be noted that not all engines are operated together, a maximum of 2 motors simultaneously with one bulb and screen.

  1. Which extension board is recommended for all connections?
  2. What recommended power supply?

Thanks again

I rather like the idea of avi*bar* having a custom board called a Barduino ;)

Reply #9 is a much clearer presentation of the situation compared to your Original Post.

An Arduino Mega should be comfortably able to do everything.

It's hard to know what would be the minimum workable servo power supply without testing. My suggestion is to start with a pack of 4 x AA NiCd cells (4.8v) as they can provide a substantial current. You could then measure the current draw from the batteries to help guide your choice of a more permanent power source.

Make sure to connect the GND for the servo power supply to the Arduino GND

...R

avibar: Hi Thanks for the comments 1. I am a professional programmer, and coding doesn't scare me ... 2. I've already done the simple tasks with individual components, and also what @Robin2 wrote

What I lack is the knowledge how to control everyone when they are connected together It should be noted that not all engines are operated together, a maximum of 2 motors simultaneously with one bulb and screen.

  1. Which extension board is recommended for all connections?
  2. What recommended power supply?

Thanks again

In general I would suggest that you first use your Arduino to get the techniques of the do-many-things-at-once lesson down solid, it is the Arduino form of cooperative tasking, the heart of event-driven code. If you remember main-loop coding from before PC's had MT OS's, it is that on these little devices.

As far as coordination, won't the job itself lend a shape to the control code?

You might do well just exploring what can be done, Arduino has a large code base to do many amazing things.