controlling a 110v switch

Hi arduiners!

I'm a complete noob on electronics...

I need a way to control a 110v current into a machine from the 5v arduino.

I simply need to switch on and off from Flash.

I have seen this post
http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1246948711/1

But apart from not knowing if this is the best way of doing what I need... I don't understand a few things..

  1. why do I need a resistor there?
  2. I supose the CN3 and the arduino goes to the ground from those not connected cables... but where do I connect the ground?

Any help is appreciated...

TIA

You may want to look at getting a relay kit like below.

http://www.ecrater.com/p/3528455/fp08-8-relay-board-kit-for-pic

Perhaps have a look at this product?

The resistor in the circuit you referenced is needed to limit current to the relay input, else you could damage the Arduino.

Not really understanding your second question about connecting the grounds. All wires that end with the ground symbol should be connected together: the negative terminal of the battery, the Arduino GND, and the relay CN3 terminal.

--
Check out our new shield: http://www.ruggedcircuits.com/html/gadget_shield.html

We can offer only generic advice since you did not specify how much current you need to switch 0.1A? 10?, 1000A?

It's the 110V that comes from the plug in the wall... I really don't know how to measure that.

I can't tell what that means? Can you explain it? Specifically, what does "from Flash" mean?

Well I suppose you have heard of Adobe Flash?

Quote:
I need a way to control a 110v current

We can offer only generic advice since you did not specify how much current you need to switch 0.1A? 10?, 1000A?

15A is about the highest current rating I've see for a 110v AC service. 1000A at 110v would be somewhat unusual where I live. :slight_smile:

Perhaps have a look at this product?

Maker Shed: Official store of Make: and Maker Faire since 2005

The resistor in the circuit you referenced is needed to limit current to the relay input, else you could damage the Arduino.

Thank you this is exactly what I need!

I just hope it will arrive in time...

maybe Solid State Relay: http://www.bryanchung.net/?p=233

  1. why do I need a resistor there?

You probably don't need the resistor but it probably won't hurt either. Most of these solid state relays, such as the one in reply #8, accept a wide range of input voltages. They are not rated for a specific current, so a current limiting resistor is not needed to protect the relay. It is not likely that the relay will draw enough current to damage your Arduino.

  1. I supose the CN3 and the arduino goes to the ground from those not connected cables... but where do I connect the ground?

The 'ground' symbol just signifies a common connection point. Connect all of the wires that go to a ground symbol together. You do not have to connect the ground to anything else.

Don

Try this: http://cgi.ebay.com/Solid-state-relay-SSR-90-480V-AC-60A-output-3-32V-DC-/120605070328?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0

it is great for high current projects and is made to connect directly to 5V digital outputs. I use them all the time and they work great!

I'm a complete noob on electronics...

I'm surprised no one said anything about that comment.

I think it unwise to play with mains voltages unless you know EXACTLY what you're doing.

This product, as suggested earlier, would probably be the best for a novice if you ABSOLUTE MUST muck around without knowing what you're doing.

I suggest a thorough understanding of electronics before playing with mains. You're gambling with serious injury, and potentially death here.

Also, to use Flash you are going to have to install some version of serial proxy like tinkerproxy or such. There are several flash libraries available to communicate with the arduino. My advice is search for arduino and flash. More than likely you will find Mike Chambers recent tutorials - they are an excellent place to start. He is also on these forums as well.

Is Flash really necessary to your situation? It seems like a lot of overhead.