Controlling a linear actuator with input from a 4x4 matrix keypad

Hello, first time poster here!

I am working on a project and feel a bit over my head. This is all brand new to me using Arduino.

I am trying to see how to control a linear actuator to cycle up and down a set number of times and then stop. I am interested in trying to imitate this setup: Control Motion Timing Of Linear Actuators - Progressive Automations

However, in their code they have it going for 300 seconds and then stopping. What I would like to do is have the option to control that 300 seconds and change it by using an analog input such as a keypad.

I have tried researching variables and how to store the input from a keypad but I have not had much luck.

Could anyone point me in the right direction? Any suggestions on examples that might be similar?

aklein89:
Hello, first time poster here!

I am working on a project and feel a bit over my head. This is all brand new to me using Arduino.

I am trying to see how to control a linear actuator to cycle up and down a set number of times and then stop. I am interested in trying to imitate this setup: Control Motion Timing Of Linear Actuators - Progressive Automations

However, in their code they have it going for 300 seconds and then stopping. What I would like to do is have the option to control that 300 seconds and change it by using an analog input such as a keypad.

I have tried researching variables and how to store the input from a keypad but I have not had much luck.

Could anyone point me in the right direction? Any suggestions on examples that might be similar?

If the code is working properly, what have you tried to make it run your way? And what were the results?

Paul

Your first issue is learning to read the keypad. Do you have a specificities one in mind?

You can either find one off the shelf that speaks by bitbanging, I2C, or SPI.

Or, you could roll your own. If you have IO bits to spare, the simplest is probably 4 input and 4 output lines, and reading it. Or a 16:1 multiplexer running off four output bits and with a common input. Or . . .

Output could be as simple as a single led to blink to indicate a key was touched, letting sixteen levels be chosen.

Or a display of a couple of digits.

Or a touchscreen.

Once you're dealt with this, poring the gizmo is trivial . . .

hawk