Controlling an Air Conditioner with a relay

We have an Air Conditioner at the Factory that doesn't have a timer. We need to control it just to turn on at a certain time, and turn off at the rest of the day. As you can see it is only 1 ON and 1 OFF cycle for the whole day.

My worries is that this AC is made for a factory, so it has high current. The ratings are probably 5.7A during operation and about 11 A at startup.

I was wondering if I could develop a simple circuit with a microcontroller and a relay to make this function, but I'm not sure if it is safe to use relays for that or not. These are the relays available in the market for me:
SSR - 5V - 40A https://ram-e-shop.com/product/re47/
Mechanical Relay 5V - 30 A​ Relay Module 5Vdc - 30Amper - 1 Relay For Arduino & Microcontrollers - RAM Electronics...​

Also I was thinking of a simple Atmega16L or an Arduino Nano for the microcontroller, would that be sufficient?

I would love to hear any recommendations or suggestions regarding this project.

Air conditioners are made up of multiple parts and multiple sensors.
for it to turn off and on, there is already a place in the electrical bits that handles the power.
there is already a switch of some sort.

based on your assumptions of power, the AC is very tiny. smaller than a standard window AC.
the typical start amps if about 5x of running amps, and on a compressor it goes higher than that.

but being a tiny AC, the device is probably plugged into a wall outlet.
you can buy a Christmas Tree timer that plugs into the outlet and then you plug in your device that turns off and on.
do check the amp loads of your device to make sure.

since a simple timer can handle a small AC unit and since your unit probably plugs in, there is no need for an electrician or any real automation.

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If your AC is larger, then get an electrician to look at it and explain what you want to do.
the simplest is to just open the low voltage on the thermostat wire so there is no need for it to run.
if it larger, then it could have a motor starter. that has a coil that energizes to close the contacts.
that coil probably uses wall voltage, but less than 1 amp and could be a possible option.
if your device is hard wired and requires a manual button press to activate the starter, then you may have to replace that starter with a magnetic starter to get the option of a low power means to start/stop

lastly, if you try to start a compressor when it is already under compresson, you can burn it out. the one timer per day could work, but if you do not have a 10 minute dead-band between stop and the next start, you risk burning up the compressor.

Yeah I have been receiving multiple recommendation to double check the power requirements because there are so many other variables than just switching on and off.

So I was thinking of an alternative solution; the AC already has a remote control that controls it's on and off with the built in controllers of the AC. Is it possible to make a simple circuit that produces the same result of using the ON/OFF buttons on the remote control?

However, I would love to know more about how they would have made a timer and a switching circuit for industrial components with high loads. I would appreciate if you have info or could tell me about that.

google motor starter.
a motor starter is just a large relay.
a relay is a simple electro magnet and a metal object
the metal object moves back and forth with the magnet.
the object and magnet are 100% isolated so are not in contact with the voltage or current of the power.
the magnet has a separate and isolated power source.
the voltage for the magnet is dependent on wraps of wire (among other things)
so, you can get a coil that will will work with 240VAC, or 120VAC or 24VAC
or even DC, like 12VDC or even 5VDC

you can use a very cheap 5v relay to turn the power off and on with for a coil that uses 240VAC, if the low power relay is rated for that voltage.

When you talk to an electrician, you find there are two basic types. Controls electricians and power electricians.
controls can be messy and complicated really fast. or be simple and logical.

On here some of the Guru’s would put a controls electician in the dust because we do controls.
and most of us here will not talk about power and tell you to talk to your local, licensed electrician.

read up on motor starters and look at some of the controls.
if you start to play with the Arduino, home alarms are a fun and easy thing.
it teaches you things like the sensor works all the time, but does not change things all the time, because there are states of operation.

Amr_Reflection:
Yeah I have been receiving multiple recommendation to double check the power requirements because there are so many other variables than just switching on and off.

So I was thinking of an alternative solution; the AC already has a remote control that controls it's on and off with the built in controllers of the AC. Is it possible to make a simple circuit that produces the same result of using the ON/OFF buttons on the remote control?

two options.
#1) - Arduino, servo, press buttons on remote.
#2) - get the codes from the remote, create a way to duplicate them, then send the signals.
the wall unit will not know where the signals originate and they do not care. as long as they are correct the unit will respond.

From experience I can say that if the rac is in any way controlled via a remote then the control mods become complex.
In that instance a copy of the control circuit is necessary and also an understanding of the effects any mods will produce.

bluejets:
From experience I can say that if the rac is in any way controlled via a remote then the control mods become complex.
In that instance a copy of the control circuit is necessary and also an understanding of the effects any mods will produce.

assuming IR for the controller, just copy each of the commands using an IR sensor.
I believe there is an IR library for TV remote controls that may be of some use.
or if the unit is a wall mounted device with a wireless thermostat, you may be able to determine the communicaiton between the unit and the themostat and replace that with an Arduino and appropriate sensor and transmistter

it seems to be logical, thanks. It's a nice idea to try, by the way. If I were you, I'd ask air conditioning repair servicing for advice as they certainly know better, don't you think. When I have some doubts or I can't fix my aircon myself I usually order servicing from them. These guys arrive so quickly and do their work just brilliantly that money I pay for their servicing may seem to be just not enough. I really appreciate their help and that they support different brands of aircons.