Correct parts for EMG prosthetic

Hello all,
I'm extremely new to Arduino and I've been researching awhile about the parts to use to create an EMG-controlled prosthetic. So I'm here to just double-check with more experienced people if everything can work properly or if it will work at all before ordering the parts.

Here are my parts with their Amazon ASINs:
1 MyoWare Muscle Sensor: B018TIWR32
1 Arduino Nano: B0097AU5OU
1 Adafruit 16-channel 12-bit servo Driver: B00E4WEXO4
5 MG996R Digital servo: B08CH2SJLR
5 SG90 Servo Motor: B072V529YD

Additionally, I did research about powering it and this is what I thought of. The goal is to have at the most 8 of the motor servos moving at the same time under, maybe, at most 100g of weight. I'm mostly concerned about the portable power supply portion not having enough current for all the servos.

Stationary Power supply:
Servo Driver's power supply: ALITOVE 5V 10A AC to DC Power Supply Adapter Converter B0852HL336

Portable Power supply:
Nano's power supply: Lithium-ion Battery 3.7 volt 2A B00C3ZXGII
Servo Driver's power supply: 4 AA batteries B07L9M6VZK

Thank you for looking at my post and it is greatly appreciated for any tips or corrections

If you are new to Arduino, then I recommend that you buy a sensor kit and an Arduino Uno. Use the example programs in he IDE with the Uno and the various components in the kit. This will give you some experience with the IDE and Arduino C++, as well as working with components and the breadboard.

Only then should you advance to the sensors and servos in your plan.

You could start with the Nano if you want, but the Uno can be powered from your PC USB port and the example programs generally expect you are using the Uno. Besides, as you are working on your project you will appreciate having the Uno available to test some code before adding it to the larger project.

@SteveMann
I think the Nano Every is a far better choice; plugs into breadboard, more RAM, more flash, spare serial port and super cheap.

SteveMann:
You could start with the Nano if you want, but the Uno can be powered from your PC USB port and the example programs generally expect you are using the Uno.

Ahem.

The Nano is powered exactly the same as the UNO, from the USB port or if other devices need to be powered in addition, you power via the "5V" pin. Very unwise to power either from "Vin" or the equivalent, the "barrel jack" of the UNO.

The UNO has a potential problem if powered via the "5V" pin while connected to a PC via USB, the Nano has no such problem. The most significant thing is that you have to somehow plug wires into the socket headers on the UNO while you can plug the Nano into a solderless breadboard or stripboard or a custom PCB, either directly soldered or socketed or if its header pins are not fitted, solder wires directly to the board.

The Nano is far more versatile and practical and uses precisely the same code as the UNO (except that it actually has two additional analog-only pins available).

Welcome to the Forum.
the subject line has a lot to do with WHO will look at your thread.

I did not expect to find EMG-controlled prosthetic

if you added that to the subject line, those who have any clue or experience would have a better chance finding your thread.

bottom right of your first post is a place to modify your post and change the subject line.

Hello all,
I'm new to Arduino and I'm trying to figure out how much voltage and current I would need for EMG prosthetic. I'm trying to power a Nano and a Adafruit 16-channel servo driver with 10 servo drivers all moving at the same time under about like about 150 g load maybe more.

So I was thinking of powering the Nano with a 3.7 volt 2A battery and to power the servos with 4AA batteries
Will this be enough voltage and current to do this? I'm not sure about the 4AA batteries having enough current.

Here are the exact motors and amounts:
5 MG996R Digital servo
5 SG90 Servo Motor:

Any input would be appreciated

You are missing the actual TIME your devices need to run. Without that information, any answer is meaningless.
Also, how well will you Nano run at the voltage you listed?
Paul

I would suggest you watch a few tutorials on basic electronics and Arduino while waiting for your Arduino cookbook to arrive. In the process you can generate a schematic, not a frizzy thing to show all connections including power and ground.

4xAA batteries will work for one or two small servos.

The usual rule of thumb for hobby projects is that the servo power supply must be able to provide at least 1 Ampere per light duty servo, so 5 Amperes for 5 SG90.

For heavy duty servos like the MG996R, up that to at least 2A/servo, or 10A per 5 servos. You may need even more, as the stall current for those is 2.5A, and the servo draws that every time it starts moving.

An inadequate servo power supply leads to uncontrollable servo twitches and jerks.

@gus2427

TOPIC MERGED.

Can take a few moments to Learn and Use The Forum

Hello, Welcome to the Arduino Forum. This guide explains how to get the best out of this forum. Please read and follow the instructions below. Being new here you might think this is having rules for the sake of rules, but that is not the case. If you don’t follow the guidelines all that happens is there is a long exchange of posts while we try to get you to tell us what we need in order to help you, which is frustrating for you and frustrating for us. The people who try to help with your pro…

It will help you get the very best out of the forum in the future.

  • Your OS and version can be valuable information, please include it along with extra security you are using. Antivirus etc.
  • Always list the version of the IDE you are using and the board version if applicable.
  • Use quote or add error messages as an attachment NOT a picture.
  • How to insert an image into your post. ( Thanks sterretje )
  • Add your sketch where applicable but please use CODE TAGS
  • Add a SCHEMATIC were needed even if it is hand drawn
  • Add working links to any specific hardware as needed (NOT links to similar items)
  • Remember that the people trying to help cannot see your problem so give as much information as you can

COMMON ISSUES

  • Ensure you have FULLY inserted the USB cables.
  • Check you have a COMMON GROUND where required. ( Thanks Perry)
  • Where possible use USB 2.0 ports or a USB 2.0 POWERED HUB to rule out USB 3.0 issues.
  • Try other computers where possible.
  • Try other USB leads where possible.
  • You may not have the correct driver installed. CH340/341 or CP2102 or FT232 VCP Drivers - FTDI
  • There may be a problem with the board check or remove your wiring first.
  • Remove any items connected to pins 0 and 1.

COMPUTER RELATED

  • Close any other serial programs before opening the IDE.
  • Ensure you turn off any additional security / antivirus just to test.
  • There may be a problem with the PC try RESTARTING it.
  • You may be selecting the wrong COM port.
  • Avoid cloud/network based installations where possible OR ensure your Network/Cloud software is RUNNING.
  • Clear your browsers CACHE.
  • Close the IDE before using any other serial programs.
  • Preferably install IDE’s as ADMINISTRATOR or your OS equivalent

ARDUINO SPECIFIC BOARDS

  • CH340/341 based clones do not report useful information to the “get board info” button.
  • NANO (Old Types) some require you to use the OLD BOOTLOADER option.
  • NANO (ALL Types) See the specific sections lower in the forum.
  • NANO (NEW Types) Install your board CORE’s.
  • Unless using EXTERNAL PROGRAMMERS please leave the IDE selection at default “AVRISP mkII”.
  • Boards using a MICRO usb connector need a cable that is both DATA and CHARGE. Many are CHARGE ONLY.

CREATE editor install locations.

  • On macOs ~/Applications/ArduinoCreateAgent-1.1/ArduinoCreateAgent.app/Contents/MacOS/config.ini
  • On Linux ~/ArduinoCreateAgent-1.1/config.ini
  • On Windows C:\Users[your user]\AppData\Roaming\ArduinoCreateAgent-1.1

Performing the above actions may help resolve your problem without further help.

Language problem ?

Try a language closer to your native language:

Thanks to all those who helped and added to this list.
Rev 2.1.A

PerryBebbington:
I think the Nano Every is a far better choice; plugs into breadboard, more RAM, more flash, spare serial port and super cheap.

You caused me to research the "Nano Every".

A fascinating beast!

They have provided it with a proper regulator, so it should actually function with a 12 V power supply to "Vin", so that is one point.

But to call it easily "compatible" with the original Nano is dubious. Its port allocations are wildly different, you are relying on the C "core" to make it work. Port manipulation would be totally different.

Just out of curiosity I have ordered a "Thinary" Nano Every-alike; the one with four extra pins. I wonder if David will comment whether the current version sold is tractable?

One thing is most certain - in respect of clones - Thinary or otherwise, it is absolutely not cheaper or even comparable in price with a plain Nano. :astonished:

I very much like the Nano Every as a good general purpose base for experimenting and general playing around with code. Way better than a Uno in my opinion.

I don't know the Thinary though.

PerryBebbington:
I very much like the Nano Every as a good general purpose base for experimenting and general playing around with code. Way better than a Uno in my opinion.

Clearly better, being more practical than a UNO as I commented above. But not as cheap as a clone Nano and I suspect there would be potential problems on some occasions if one assumed to port UNO code directly as is automatic with the "plain" Nano. :grinning:

Paul__B:
Ahem.

...

The Nano is far more versatile and practical and uses precisely the same code as the UNO (except that it actually has two additional analog-only pins available).

I guess I should get a couple of Nanos...

Steve, get the Nano Every, not the Nano. Compare the specification of them both. The Every is available in a pack of 3, which is even cheaper.

jremington:
...
The usual rule of thumb for hobby projects is that the servo power supply must be able to provide at least 1 Ampere per light duty servo, so 5 Amperes for 5 SG90.

For heavy duty servos like the MG996R, up that to at least 2A/servo, or 10A per 5 servos. You may need even more, as the stall current for those is 2.5A, and the servo draws that every time it starts moving.
...

Alright, thank you this is very helpful!
How would you recommend doing this? After reading this, I was thinking of using a voltage stepper with an RC battery but I think I will still have less current I would need. unless there is something I'm missing about powering circuits.

So what exactly do you mean by a "voltage stepper"? :astonished:

Paul__B:
So what exactly do you mean by a "voltage stepper"? :astonished:

Sorry I meant a "voltage step down converter" :slight_smile:

This topic was automatically closed 120 days after the last reply. New replies are no longer allowed.