Creating PCB from schematic

I am building and testing a circuit similar to the attached picture on tinkercad. I want to create a pcb that will reduce the size of the circuit that i can use when i am able to physically build the circuit. In reality I will be using a TB67H420FTG motor driver(as my motors are quite high power) however this is not available as a part on tinkercad. How can i use the schematic diagram of the circuit from tinkercad to design a PCB. And how can i use just the Atmega chip from the arduino to reduce the size even more.

Thank you.

Limit the scope of your question.

I'm not familiar with Tinkercad. Does it allow users to create their own symbols? The datasheet gives the info for making the board footprint. http://toshiba.semicon-storage.com/info/docget.jsp?did=59110&prodName=TB67H420FTG

This would be straightforward in Eagle. I create the board footprint Package, I create the schematic Symbol, lastly I create the Device which is where I Connect the package pins to the schematic pins.

Tinkercad is Tinkertoys for electronics. By the time you’re six years old, you’ve outgrown it. Learn a real tool like Eagle or KiCad. Anything else is a waste of your time.

A couple of thoughts....

1) I just looked at tinkercad and cannot see a method of converting circuits made in tinkercad to a PCB layout program. It seems tinkercad is made for making "breadboards" or "solderless breadboards".

2) It would seem this is your first foray into building circuits. If this is the case I suggest you build a "prototype" to wring out any design issues. You can use this Pololu Board for your driver.

3) The TB67H420FTG only comes in one package size. Without experience and tools to solder very small leads you will likely end up frustrated and without a working device. I guess you could order a stencil, paste solder and an oven of some sort but again most folks don't hit a home run on the first try.

To just use the 328 google “ minimal Arduino”.

Hi, Welcome to the forum.

Please read the post at the start of any forum , entitled "How to use this Forum". OR http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php/topic,148850.0.html.

Why do you need it to be small? What power/current is your motor? What is the application?

It would be easier if you made your PCB with headers to plug a Nano into it. You would cut down on the design work. You would cut down on the debugging needed just to get the 328 programmed with bootloader and your code. If you have a controller fault then its easy to swap out/in another Nano.

Can you post a copy of your circuit, as a jpg Export, image.

Thanks.. Tom... :)

How did you guys determine the OP wanted to use a 328? I could see no attachement.

“And how can i use just the Atmega chip from the arduino to reduce the size even more.”

There was previously an attachment.

I wouldn’t try putting this part on a board myself, leave that to the robotic pick & place shops.
0.5mm pitch on the pads.
9A capable part, need some serious heat sinking too.

A couple of thoughts.... "1) I just looked at tinkercad and cannot see a method of converting circuits made in tinkercad to a PCB layout program. It seems tinkercad is made for making "breadboards" or "solderless breadboards". 2) It would seem this is your first foray into building circuits. If this is the case I suggest you build a "prototype" to wring out any design issues. You can use this Pololu Board for your driver. 3) The TB67H420FTG only comes in one package size. Without experience and tools to solder very small leads you will likely end up frustrated and without a working device. I guess you could order a stencil, paste solder and an oven of some sort but again most folks don't hit a home run on the first try."

Thanks for you reply, yes this is my first time making circuits like this virtually. I am unable to build this in real life due to covid restrictions and it makes up a part of a project i am doing in university. Therefore it needs to be modelled virtually using an Arduino simulator. I am 3D designing a smart motor module and need to use a relatively high power encoded motor(Polulu 50:1 Metal Gearmotor 37Dx70L mm 24V with 64 CPR Encoder) which was why i chose the TB67H420FTG motor driver as it can drive a greater current without overheating.

I was therefore going to design and test my code on tinkercad arduino simulator(using a basic L293d motor driver as that is all there is available) but design a PCB that would would fit the TB67H420FTG motor driver. I am looking to build a PCB in order to make the circuit smaller so i can fit it in a smaller casing and have a more compact design. In reality it will not be possible to build any of this in real life due to the pandemic. Do you think this is a feasable method?

537sauch: I am building and testing a circuit similar to the attached picture on tinkercad. I want to create a pcb that will reduce the size of the circuit that i can use when i am able to physically build the circuit. In reality I will be using a TB67H420FTG motor driver(as my motors are quite high power) however this is not available as a part on tinkercad.

Assuming you are at the level that you have the ability to design a PCB like this, I don't understand why you are still using Tinkercad. You should have outgrown it years ago when you were designing your first PCBs (if this is your first, just forget it).

I'm using Tinkercad in school as a teaching aid for 3D design, and recently for the Arduino emulator. Even with a 3-component setup I ran into its limitations already. The fact that they even have the obsolete L293 driver in there, and - worse - as only option for a motor driver, is telling. Tinkercad probably also doesn't have proper connectors available for the thick wires to the motors.

That's indeed a 9A capable chip, will need a heat sink. From the looks of it, hou can use thermal vias and a heat sink on the back of the PCB. Or find a way to clamp a heat sink on the top of it. The 0.5mm pitch is another challenge - ever tried to manually fix solder bridges in such a chip? I can tell you it's not easy!

The only chance of success soldering such a chip is indeed by stencilling the solder paste onto the PCB. I don't have an oven myself; hot plate and hot air gun works quite well. Nonetheless I would avoid such chips if not absolutely necessary.

Then the circuit design. 9A motor driver, 24V and 5V circuits on the same PCB, high currents, presumably PWM so massive switching noise... lots of decoupling and filtering needed to keep that ATmega running reliably.

You will have to worry about the thermal properties of your project. How do you get rid of the waste heat of that chip, and the heat of the motors?

Start by buying the components on breakout board, like the Polulu module. Make sure everyhing works. The emulator can tell you only whether your code gives the correct signals to the motors and whether the basic logic is sound, not whether it will work in real life. There's just too much difference between the two.