Current sinking on TLC5940

I've just started playing with a TLC5940, and done some basic calculations.

From what I understand, the 5940 sinks current from my 'Arduino LED' ® collection, 16 of them. Say they draw 20mA each, then doesn't that current eventually pass back to the PSU, via the 5940 ground, pin 22, so pin 22 would have 320mA flowing through it? I've never really seen this mentioned anywhere, but that seems like a lot for a breadboard, I was thinking of bending up the pin and soldering something a bit more substantial to it as a ground back to the PSU (making sure the Arduino is on the same ground, I'm using a separate 5V supply for the LEDs).

Does this sound like a good idea, or one that's just unnecessary? I know (well, pretty sure) it'll work, I just don't know if I need to do it. I'm using plain old generic breadboard, it's no big deal if I melt it but would like to avoid it.

From what I understand, the 5940 sinks current from my 'Arduino LED' ® collection,

How?
It sinks current, the current is supplied from what ever you connect the anodes to.

so pin 22 would have 320mA flowing through it?

Yes.

but that seems like a lot for a breadboard

Yes that is why I never recommend solderless breadboard.

Does this sound like a good idea, or one that's just unnecessary?

unnecessary

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From what I understand, the 5940 sinks current from my 'Arduino LED' ® collection,
How?
It sinks current, the current is supplied from what ever you connect the anodes to.

I was trying to be funny, every Arduino project starting with an LED... that is connected to a 5V 2A PSU...

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but that seems like a lot for a breadboard
Yes that is why I never recommend solderless breadboard.
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Does this sound like a good idea, or one that's just unnecessary?
unnecessary

Err, you don't recommend them because they melt but assuming that anything that can fail will doesn't apply?

you don't recommend them because they melt

No, I don't recommend them because the connections are notoriously intermittent. They will take the current but you can spend all your time waggling wires trying to get it to work.

I recommend soldering circuits on strip board.

but assuming that anything that can fail will doesn't apply?

Not sure all the words are in the right order but you have to consider the probability of failure not just the possibility of it.

The breadboard can handle a lot more than 320mA, at least a few amps.

The point is not so much resistance, as reliability.

I am sure wherever you are, you have "power boards" - you plug into one power point (wall socket) and can plug four or (for our sort of people) six or eight mains appliances into them. You should never use them for heaters, electric jugs, toasters and such.

Over the years, these seem to have become much more flimsy. Originally, they used two flat spring contacts - like the proper power point - which had a broad contact on the plug pin. Now they mostly have a long notch in a single piece of sheet metal strip (brass, bronze?) which snakes from one outlet to the next. It may be the intent is to have a greater pressure with a similar (insertion) force over a smaller area, but I suspect it's just trying to get away with the flimsiest product.

What has this to do with the original question? Hmmm.

Yes, I have noticed the unreliability of breadboards and take your parallel with power strips. I first started playing with Arduinos about a year ago, and for a while was mystified, and very frustrated, that something that should work just didn’t. I make sure now to use decent boards, but sometimes there are still issues of course. I appreciate the note to that effect, but it is still a lot of fun to just plip some circuit onto a board and see how it runs, with the knowledge that if it doesn’t run then most likely I have a poor connection. I also find that the components are easier to reuse.

I didn’t think a breadboard would go anywhere near a few amps, I was concerned over a tenth of that current, so that’s handy to know, thanks.

Like I said, I’ve only been playing with Arduinos for a year; before that, I’d made a hobby of electronics in my teen years. While transistors did actually exist then, we didn’t have anything like inexpensive microcontrollers, and we didn’t have the Internet, with a staggering amount of knowledge and people willing to share their time and that knowledge. Within my current questions scope, I can easily make a lamp with PWM regulated, bright LEDs for low running cost, with infrared remote control, have it work, and have solid advice on things I’m unsure about. I find all this incredibly cool.