Cutting insulation on data wires

Hello,
i have a simple question to ask. On a gps module (UBLOX NEO M8N + COMPASS), i had to cut the connector on the data wires to connect an other one and i had some trouble removing the insulation after the cut. For me as a rookie, it is a hard task to remove the insulation on such small wires. The wires are like the arduino jumper wires but a little smaller and the core is consisted of multiple very thin silicon wires. I wish i could show you the cross section but i don't have info on these wires. So my question is does it matter if i cut one or two of these very thin silicon wires along with the insulation? After all i am going to solder it.

sirick:
Hello,
i have a simple question to ask. On a gps module (UBLOX NEO M8N + COMPASS), i had to cut the connector on the data wires to connect an other one and i had some trouble removing the insulation after the cut. For me as a rookie, it is a hard task to remove the insulation on such small wires. The wires are like the arduino jumper wires but a little smaller and the core is consisted of multiple very thin silicon wires. I wish i could show you the cross section but i don't have info on these wires. So my question is does it matter if i cut one or two of these very thin silicon wires along with the insulation? After all i am going to solder it.

If you already have soldering equipment, why don't you get some proper wire strippers. The kind that have positions marked for various wire sizes should work.

If you take time to google copper wire and google silicon wire, you will find there are no silicon wires. If there were silicon wires, you would never be able to solder them.

Paul

Practice makes perfect.


Common stranded wires like this usually have 7 or 9 fine conductors.

Cutting 1 or 2 probably will make little difference in low current applications.

As mentioned, get a proper wire stripper and do some practicing ;).


When soldering, the solder should not wick under the insulation.

larryd:
Practice makes perfect.


Common stranded wires like this usually have 7 or 9 fine conductors.

Cutting 1 or 2 probably will make little difference in low current applications.

As mentioned, get a proper wire stripper and do some practicing ;).


When soldering, the solder should not wick under the insulation.

ok i have ordered a wire stripper and i ll keep practicing then. Thank you both for the info!

When you strip insulation from a wire, move the cutter/stripper in the same direction as the wire(away from).

i.e. ‘not’ at angle to the wire, this should prevent cutting any of the conductors.

Cutting one or two of the individual wires, when cutting the insulation, might not electrically make much difference.

However cutting the wires does increase the flex stress at the insulation core junction, so its best avoided.

srnet:
Cutting one or two of the individual wires, when cutting the insulation, might not electrically make much difference.

However cutting the wires does increase the flex stress at the insulation core junction, so its best avoided.

And using lead-free solder on such wires will ensure there will be a break at the solder point. That is one reason why crimped connector pins are used.

Paul

Doesn’t matter which kind of solder, solder to wire junction is always a weak point that should never be
subjected to flexing - ie use strain-relief (always a good idea anyway). Note that crimp pins have strain relief
that grips the insulation (if installed properly).

FWIW, my practice has always been to strip slightly less than I need, twist the strands and solder just the tip, then pull back the insulation beyond where I need, twist further, tin it all and then have the insulation while hot, slip over the intersection of the un-tinned and tinned wires.