Danger of Overcurrent when connecting INPUT_PULLUP pin directly to ground?

I have a project that I'm using a momentary button in series with a digital INPUT_PULLUP pin and the Arduino's ground pin to detect a button press. I understand that shorting an ouput pin or 5V directly to ground can cause an overcurrent, but I wanted to check if there was any danger of this happening while using the internal pullup resistor on the Arduino.

From a glance, it looks like the resistor can be anywhere from 20kΩ to 50kΩ, which means that at worst, it should be running 25mA through the circuit I've made, which seems to be below the 40mA current limit I've heard per pin.

Is there anyone who can verify that this isn't a danger to the board I'm using (A Nano)?

Also, as a follow up, is there a danger of overcurrent when using multiple buttons like this coming from different pins but all connecting to ground?

minuet:
I have a project that I'm using a momentary button in series with a digital INPUT_PULLUP pin and the Arduino's ground pin to detect a button press. I understand that shorting an ouput pin or 5V directly to ground can cause an overcurrent, but I wanted to check if there was any danger of this happening while using the internal pullup resistor on the Arduino.

From a glance, it looks like the resistor can be anywhere from 20kΩ to 50kΩ, which means that at worst, it should be running 25mA through the circuit I've made, which seems to be below the 40mA current limit I've heard per pin.

Is there anyone who can verify that this isn't a danger to the board I'm using (A Nano)?

Also, as a follow up, is there a danger of overcurrent when using multiple buttons like this coming from different pins but all connecting to ground?

The pin goes to a gate on a FET inside the microcontroller. Can't get much current from that. The internal circuit is different when you define the pin as output.

Paul

Thank you Paul.

Glad to know that I'm not going to be smoking out my Arduinos by doing this.

From a glance, it looks like the resistor can be anywhere from 20kΩ to 50kΩ, which means that at worst, it should be running 25mA through the circuit I've made.

I think your maths is a bit off!
5V / 20000Ohms = 0.25mA

It is the intended design of an pin with an internal pull up resistor that it be shorted to ground.

5V/20K = 0.25mA (250uA).
Shorting the Input to Gnd merely takes away the 1uA the input pin needs for a high.

The internal pullup provides no protection if the pin is set to Output, commanded to High and then shorted to Gnd.
If left shorted, it will blow the output drive transistor sooner or later.