DC motor/encoder driver?

Hey guys,

So stepper motors have stepper motor drivers. They convert digital signals from your microcontroller into the microsteps on your stepper motor. My question is if there is a dc motor/encoder counterpart for this? A relatively inexpensive chip that you hook the encoder wires up to, the motor leads to, and you can adjust the control parameters (PID variables, or PD variables, or what ever). Then feed it a position to obtain?

Thanks!

What about asking Aunt Google or Uncle Arduino-Forum?
Search item "DC motor shield for Arduino" ...

And then: "dc motor library" or "dc motor control" ...

  1. Help yourself and then
  2. you will be supported if you have more complex questions

You are reinventing the servomotor. There probably are servomotor control chips, but I can't
say I've seen many. You basically need an H-bridge, a current sensor and a microcontroller.

There are lots of microcontrollers with support for motion control, but they tend to outsource
any power handling.

MarkT, thanks for the reply. I know that they are called servomotors. I just didn't want to call them that because I didn't want people to think of the hobbyist 1-180 degree or continuous servo motors. An all in one chip is what I am mainly looking for. I know I can use an H-bridge and then use PWM from a microcontroller to change the voltage, but I would like to do it as simply as possible :slight_smile:

rpt007, I have already done a brief google search. Didn't find exactly what I am looking for. My time is valuable, so I thought asking arduino was the most time efficient way to find the information. If your time that I am wasting is that valuable you probably shouldn't have wasted it leaving a snarky reply.

I work in a lab where somebody designed a system using DC motors and encoders rather than stepper motors. They use Labview MAX to drive the system using a PCI 7344. Too many wires and screw terminals. It's causes lots of headaches and frustration for anybody who used it.

On the encoder side the LS7366R is the best chip to use. Superdroid robots sells a breakout board for it. You can also find a premade sketch for it on github. Integrating that chip into the system has been the easiest programming problem I've ever faced.

Henradrie:
I work in a lab where somebody designed a system using DC motors and encoders rather than stepper motors. They use Labview MAX to drive the system using a PCI 7344. Too many wires and screw terminals. It's causes lots of headaches and frustration for anybody who used it.

On the encoder side the LS7366R is the best chip to use. Superdroid robots sells a breakout board for it. You can also find a premade sketch for it on github. Integrating that chip into the system has been the easiest programming problem I've ever faced.

I actually ordered a hand full of those quadrature decoder chips for my thesis, but didn't end up using them, so maybe I can use them for this. Thanks for the reply!