Dc to Dc converter for Arduino

Hello guys, what Dc to Dc converter is suitable for Arduino to control it PWM? I can't find one to continue on my project. It is hard to found one because what I found is control via potentiometer.

What do you want to do with it?

A DCDC converter uses PWM to work but it's not meant to be controlled by an Arduino. Or do you want to control it's output voltage? If so, say so :wink:

Yes, it like I use arduino to control it duty cycle.

Do you want to turn the DC-DC converter on and off?

DC-DC converters have a control loop within them to control the PWM and thus regulate the output voltage
to the desired value. The PWM rate and duty cycle are both complex functions of the load and desired output
voltage (though the vast majority of DC-DC converters have a fixed output voltage).

Allowing something external to control the PWM would break the control loop and lose load regulation
completely.

This question sounds like classic xyproblem to me: What are you trying to actually do? Give us
context so we can see if your approach makes any sense in the first place...

Actually I wanted to build a simple Dc to dc converter for MPPT testing.

Ah, that's a different matter - you are designing a MPPT?

That's a fairly involved process, due to the need for protection from over current, but basically
you need at minimum a half-H-bridge, inductor and capacitors, voltage sensing and current sensing,
and a fast over-current shutdown circuit using a comparator (software will not be quick enough).
Layout needs to be tight in a dc-dc converter, its not a trivial task to work on

The problem all DC-DC converters have to address is on over-current the inductor saturates and within
a very short space of time (microseconds) effectively becomes a zero-ohm resistor and thus the
switching device burns up rapidly.

Two solutions are:

  1. fast over-current detection using a comparator + flipflop and some sort of current sensing,
  2. air-cored inductor (cannot saturate, much much larger than a ferrite cored inductor though).

Since you want to monitor max power point you need to sense current anyway, so this can be
shared with the protection circuitry.

MarkT:
Ah, that's a different matter - you are designing a MPPT?

That's a fairly involved process, due to the need for protection from over current, but basically
you need at minimum a half-H-bridge, inductor and capacitors, voltage sensing and current sensing,
and a fast over-current shutdown circuit using a comparator (software will not be quick enough).
Layout needs to be tight in a dc-dc converter, its not a trivial task to work on

The problem all DC-DC converters have to address is on over-current the inductor saturates and within
a very short space of time (microseconds) effectively becomes a zero-ohm resistor and thus the
switching device burns up rapidly.

Two solutions are:

  1. fast over-current detection using a comparator + flipflop and some sort of current sensing,
  2. air-cored inductor (cannot saturate, much much larger than a ferrite cored inductor though).

Since you want to monitor max power point you need to sense current anyway, so this can be
shared with the protection circuitry.

Since I found they use a simple buck converter to step down the voltage, they use MOSFET, inductor, resistor, diode and capacitor to build it. I am not sure if I make a simple buck converter, can I still test this MPPT. I just wanted to use different method to test the MPPT algorithm and I'm not really focusing on the hardware part. Would need your advice.

Really need more information.
What exactly are you trying to test?
MPPT controllers are primarily designed to charge batteries, and you cant build one without knowing something about the power ratings of the solar panels , the type (chemistry) of the battery being charged.
There are many types of MPPT algorithms.
Are you trying to make comparisons between them.