Desoldering components?

Here is the parts I want to desolder: https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-kigPwH4mke4/UZi89pOB9II/AAAAAAAACRI/kITx2b1IcC0/s800/gba_sp_remove_components.jpg I am trying to desolder the one on the middle upper left, the one under the button. I have a solder wick, the brand is Tech spray. I also have a crappy 30 wat solder iron from radio shack. So I melt the solder then I quickly put the wick over it and put the iron over it, but nothing happens. I know that the wick works because I tried doing it with a big amount of solder. What could the problem possibly be? I got a little bit off but no more will come off.

Parts like this are normally removed with a hot air rework station, http://www.amazon.com/Aoyue-968-Digital-Rework-Station/dp/B000HDG0AO/ref=pd_sxp_f_pt

You are only going to melt things badly with a wick

Paint stripper pointed at the back of the board. Components drop right off.

EDIT: That assumes you don't mind all the other components coming off as well.

pwillard is right you need a hot air gun, and you will be lucky if you can get it off without melting it at that.

So I melt the solder then I quickly put the wick over it and put the iron over it,

For future reference the way to use solder wick, is to lay it on the bench, then put the soldering iron over it. Then holding the reel end of the wick bend the wick over the soldering iron tip. Keep that tension and apply it to the joint, you will see the solder suck up. The problem is that you can't always get it all up especially from under the pads. It's main use is to clean up afterwards.

Just for completeness, there’s also “Chip Quik” which is a low melting point alloy (58oC) that mixes with the existing solder / makes it easier to remove at a lower temperature. Plenty of videos on Youtube showing how it works.

I believe it’s an alloy of 50% bismuth, 20% indium, 20% lead, and 10% tin.

Chagrin:
Just for completeness, there’s also “Chip Quik” which is a low melting point alloy (58oC) that mixes with the existing solder / makes it easier to remove at a lower temperature. Plenty of videos on Youtube showing how it works.

I believe it’s an alloy of 50% bismuth, 20% indium, 20% lead, and 10% tin.

'I am thinking of getting this?
http://www.ebay.com/itm/2in1-SMD-Soldering-Rework-Station-Hot-Air-Iron-852D-5Tips-ESD-PLCC-BGA-/370550230066?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item564683cc32

Is this a good thing to get???
Also what components are wicks used for, or when should I use it?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rdMpoobYDkk&feature=youtube_gdata_player

Watch that.... he shows the best and easiest method to desolder.

Also I find desolder wick oxidises so old stuff no longer works reliably - you want the copper braid to look bright and new, not old and tarnished.

Treated wick (“soder-wick”, tech spray, and so on) looks tarnished, but it’s not.
My method is just laying atop the area to desolder from, touching the iron to it; the solder starts travelling up the strands, remove it and the heat, cut of the solder-filled part and go along.

I’m not certain which component you’re trying to remove there, but it’s possible that by touching each joint, “circularly” (touch, touch, touch,…) that you can pluck it off with the tweezers while everything is molten / semi-molten…

All easier done than to express verbally perhaps.

I have a suction bulb with a teflon nozzle. Go around, touch each joint, suck up the solder with the bulb. On through-holes I can sometimes touch the joint and then blow air through it to blow the solder out of the hole.

The trick is to touch each joint for the minimum amount of time possible. Just a quick touch and go. Otherwise you will pull the pad off the board.

mrdove500: Is this a good thing to get??? Also what components are wicks used for, or when should I use it?

Wick is good when you have too much solder and want to remove some. It's useless for de-soldering/removing components.

[quote author=Tom Carpenter link=topic=180630.msg1338829#msg1338829 date=1375387513] Paint stripper pointed at the back of the board. Components drop right off.

EDIT: That assumes you don't mind all the other components coming off as well. [/quote]

what?

what is this method you speak of sir? :)

links?

thanks

xl97: [quote author=Tom Carpenter link=topic=180630.msg1338829#msg1338829 date=1375387513] Paint stripper pointed at the back of the board. Components drop right off.

what?

what is this method you speak of sir? :) [/quote]

He's referring to a heat gun which can also be used to strip paint.

http://www.harborfreight.com/1500-watt-dual-temperature-heat-gun-572-1112-96289.html

ahh.. (duh!)

I read 'paint stripper' and assumed it was 'chemical' in nature

(thanks!) :)

A domestic oven at 180oC/gas mark 6, for 10 minutes does the same to an upturned board. Don’t try this when the Sunday roast is cooking, if you want to stay married. :astonished:

Don't do it in a domestic oven at all. You'll end up getting lead and other nasty fumes inside your oven which could potentially then get into any food you cook. Really really really bad idea!