Development toolkit for a newbe

Hello everybody, thank you for reading this thread.

I am new to Arduinos and micro-controllers.

I just bought :

  • 5 Arduino UNO R3 MEGA328P ATMEGA16U2
  • 2 DC 5V 4-Mechanical Channel Relays Shield Module For Arduino UNO R3
  • Breadboard Power Supply Kits with 65pcs Jumper Wire Cable For Arduino Project
  • 2 AC Power Supply 9V 1A Adapter EU Plug for Arduino UNO
  • 5PCS T type 9V DC Battery Power Cable Barrel Jack Connector for Arduino

I have the following projects in mind:

Current Projects
Intelligent light switch Relays - Kitchen table light
Gas Sensors / Temperature Sensors - Kitchen Stove / Shower
HDMI Channel auto Switcher (on NVR Warning TV input) - Master Bedroom
NVR Warning beep extension (current thread) - Studio / First floor / Bathroom /
Air Quality Sensor - Garden
Terminal Display - First floor / Library / Studio

Any general thoughts about those project? Has anybody tried any of those and would like to give advice?

Would anybody think of anything else I should need for development? I feel my parts list is incomplete and I do not currently have any electronic parts in my workshop. This is all very new to me.

Thank you
Regards

9V block batteries are not very useful with Arduinos, they will have to be exchanged every other day.

Better are (reliable) 5V supplies, which can power an Arduino immediately, or 7V supplies for use with the on-board 5V regulator.

For final devices you can use smaller boards (Pro Mini...), which can also be powered by 2-3 1.5V cells, or rechargeable batteries of 3V to 5V.

I'd start learning the basics first (connect buttons, activate LEDs and relays, use SPI and I2C buses...). Then get the sensors and other modules for your projects, and accompanied by data sheets and Arduino libraries and sample code. Then play around with the samples, until you know how to integrate the sensors and actors into your code.

Hi,

As said you need to concentrate on the basics for now, but something to look at for the future, to connect all your far reached functions, are the ESP8266 wifi modules and modules like the Sonoff switches.

Plenty of examples of both on Ytube to give you an idea of how the work (wp :wink: )

DrDiettrich:
9V block batteries are not very useful with Arduinos, they will have to be exchanged every other day.

Better are (reliable) 5V supplies, which can power an Arduino immediately, or 7V supplies for use with the on-board 5V regulator.

For final devices you can use smaller boards (Pro Mini…), which can also be powered by 2-3 1.5V cells, or rechargeable batteries of 3V to 5V.

I’d start learning the basics first (connect buttons, activate LEDs and relays, use SPI and I2C buses…). Then get the sensors and other modules for your projects, and accompanied by data sheets and Arduino libraries and sample code. Then play around with the samples, until you know how to integrate the sensors and actors into your code.

Wow thanks a lot! I’ll be getting one of those batteries pack for 1.5v batts and eventually Arduino Nano for the final devices, if that’s what you mean?

Do you have any suggestions for arduino cases? The IP66 one I’ve seen on Ebay are pretty pricey…

I will definetely start from scratch with those LED tutorials. Looks like I am pretty much set up. I’ve purchased a component kits with resistor, switch and LED’s.

You break it down pretty well for the code and protocols.

ricky101: Hi,

As said you need to concentrate on the basics for now, but something to look at for the future, to connect all your far reached functions, are the ESP8266 wifi modules and modules like the Sonoff switches.

Plenty of examples of both on Ytube to give you an idea of how the work (wp ;) )

Will definetely concentrate on the basics for now. I had a look at the wifi modules and the Sonoff switches. Looks great. Thanks

Learn to write non-blocking event-driven co-operative multi-tasking code which is (can be) far simpler than it sounds.

The first link in my sig space at the bottom of this post teaches about blocking code, ways to not block and using the millis() function to make things happen on time. How do you cook breakfast so that eggs, bacon and coffee all finish at the same time? Same way you get lights to blink independently together. :)

The second link covers reading incoming serial chars without waiting between arrivals. That tutorial introduces a simple state machine, a very valuable tool in the non-blocking toolbox.

The third link goes into interrupts. Most things really don't need interrupts, which have a speed and memory overhead. Some people use them to get around using blocking code, but that uses up an interrupt you don't have to. Buu-uuuut if it absitively, posolutey has to be timed to the gnat's hair then an interrupt is your tool. They're good to not have tied up when you want to add a library that needs them.

For cases I'd say that form follows function. IP rated cases may be good for outdoor devices, but that's a science of its own. Each hole, for a switch or display, invalidates the IP level of the case.

Each project may require a case of a different form factor, depending on the user accessible switches, labels or displays, and connectors to external components. Or should it be wearable?

Shush, my first circuits were housed in soap boxes, because these were cheap and easy to cut holes into them ;-)

The Arduino Playground has articles on capacitive sensing. Holes for switches are not required using those. They don't wear out for a long time if ever, either.

Thanks for your help. Will come back on this thread once I have received my parts... Regards