Did I kill my Arduino?

I had been developing circuit on a breadboard involving 15V and the 5V from arduino. In a sphaghetti of wires, I accidentally connected the 15v to 5v. However I removed it immediately.

But now when I connect the arduino to usb or external power, the L led lights up and stays on. The FTDI chip gets kind of hot.

Is it dead? =(

"He's dead Jim!

If you work with breadboards a lot, why not use one of the more minimalistic variants of arduino? The advantage is that you can replace prematurely deceased parts separately. The 'Bare Bones Board' or 'Boarduino' come to my mind. These deliberately come without the USB adapter on-board.

Is it dead?

Dead yea, and it's time to get a good lawyer and then turn yourself in to the authorities as they might go easier on you if it's your first offence. ;)

Lefty

madworm: "He's dead Jim!

If you work with breadboards a lot, why not use one of the more minimalistic variants of arduino? The advantage is that you can replace prematurely deceased parts separately. The 'Bare Bones Board' or 'Boarduino' come to my mind. These deliberately come without the USB adapter on-board.

I am not that advanced with arduino to go all breadboard. Besides a full arduino from ebay doesn't cost much more than its breadboa ord variants. I really think they should have some sort of safeguard against this. Most people will be using the arduino to control things that run at highier voltages. Its not very hard for someone to do what I did on a fairly complex breadboard circuit.

Too bad it was only my second project with arduino.

Well, adding "fool proof" protection adds to cost, quite a lot btw. If you want that, have a look at the boards by 'RuggedCircuits'.

And having separate "units" for programming/uploading code and the "core" board is not really that complex at all. If you have understood using breadboards, that step is a piece of cake. Like LEGO.

I understand what you're saying but a simple zener diode connected across the 5V and GND would have stopped this from happening?

I did look at the rugged version from RuggedCircuits. Unfortunately it costs twice as much as a regular arduino.

I did look at the rugged version from RuggedCircuits. Unfortunately it costs twice as much as a regular arduino.

It's kind of a 'no free lunch' situation. You either learn from mistakes and pay the repair costs, or you buy something designed to help those with little electronics experiance from their painful and sometimes costly mistakes.

That ruggedcircuit design is close to being bullet proof, and well worth the price asked for those needing that kind of protection. Would be perfect for classroom lab training for raw begineers and I'm sure that was one of it's target markets.

Lefty

I really think they should have some sort of safeguard against this. Most people will be using the arduino to control things that run at highier voltages. Its not very hard for someone to do what I did on a fairly complex breadboard circuit.

That's why you need to wire the circuit carefully with reference to the schematic, then check the circuit again before applying the power. In fact do continuity tests with all the power rails too.

If you don't proceed with care then you pay the price. Always a good idea to keep the layout separate between different voltage domains, but its the double-checking that stops accidents happening.

I wanted to ask, is it possible that one particular component has failed on my board, or the complete baord is toast?

Consider this scenario : I have a transistor with Vcc of 12V. I want to control this from my arduino. Is there any safer method than a jumper from arduino output to the base of the transistor (via a resistor ofcourse)?

Does the duemilanove have protection agaisnt reverse Vin polarity? This says that reverse Vin will kill the microcontroller. However I once connected 9V DC jack in reverse polarity and the board survived it. I just want to know if they have included protection against reverse voltage on Vin so next time I will check the jack before plugging it in.

I did look at the rugged version from RuggedCircuits. Unfortunately it costs twice as much as a regular arduino

But if it saves you having to buy two boards because you screwed one up, that's not such a bad deal, is it?

Does the duemilanove have protection agaisnt reverse Vin polarity? This says that reverse Vin will kill the microcontroller. However I once connected 9V DC jack in reverse polarity and the board survived it. I just want to know if they have included protection against reverse voltage on Vin so next time I will check the jack before plugging it in.

The series polarity protection diode is wired between the external power connector and Vin, so if you use the external power connector you are protected from reverse voltage. If you use the Vin pin to source power you do not have reverse voltage protection.

Lefty

retrolefty:

Does the duemilanove have protection agaisnt reverse Vin polarity? This says that reverse Vin will kill the microcontroller.
However I once connected 9V DC jack in reverse polarity and the board survived it.
I just want to know if they have included protection against reverse voltage on Vin so next time I will check the jack before plugging it in.

The series polarity protection diode is wired between the external power connector and Vin, so if you use the external power connector you are protected from reverse voltage. If you use the Vin pin to source power you do not have reverse voltage protection.

Lefty

Got it. Thanks.