Did I overpower my blue tooth device?

I recently got this blue tooth device http://www.amazon.com/Ventisonic%C2%AE-Wireless-Bluetooth-Transceiver-Arduino/dp/B00K3C3E7Q/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1408813439&sr=8-1&keywords=Ventisonic%C2%AE+Wireless+Bluetooth+RF+Transceiver+Module+serial+RS232+HC-06+for+Arduino+TTL to try to communicate with a Windows 8.1 computer via a blue tooth dongle.

The computer can see the blue tooth signal and connect to it but after a moment it says Not Connected! The light on the blue tooth device never changes from blinking a few times a second except at the very moment I send it an AT command.

I had the blue tooth device connected to the 5v pin on the Arduino Uno before I saw one of the reviews said it was a 3.3v device. How likely or unlikely is it that the 5v dameged the blue tooth? And how would I test if it was damaged or not?

I am also able to use AT commands through the arduino and get a reply back from the blue tooth.

My circuit is: Vcc to 3.3v Gnd to Gnd Tx to Rx Rx to Tx

using wire jumpers.

I have tried using a 9v battery to the Vin pin and (when sending AT commands) a USB cable without the 9v battery.

Thanks

I saw one of the reviews said it was a 3.3v device.

Well the product description did say:-

Operating Voltage:3.3V

Given that your PC can still see it and it responds to AT commands I tgik you have got away with it.

Then why does it disconnect after a moment?

What am I doing wrong?!

What am I doing wrong

No idea. Mainly because I don't know what you are doing.

But this sometimes happens with bluetooth devices if you do not pair them correctly.

Grumpy_Mike:

What am I doing wrong

No idea. Mainly because I don't know what you are doing.

Sorry about that. My goal is to use the "Physical Pixel" example from the File -> Examples menu in arduino's IDE software:

/*
  Physical Pixel

 An example of using the Arduino board to receive data from the
 computer.  In this case, the Arduino boards turns on an LED when
 it receives the character 'H', and turns off the LED when it
 receives the character 'L'.
*/
const int ledPin = 13; // the pin that the LED is attached to
int incomingByte;      // a variable to read incoming serial data into

void setup() {
  // initialize serial communication:
  Serial.begin(9600);
  // initialize the LED pin as an output:
  pinMode(ledPin, OUTPUT);
}

void loop() {
  // see if there's incoming serial data:
  if (Serial.available() > 0) {
    // read the oldest byte in the serial buffer:
    incomingByte = Serial.read();
    // if it's a capital H (ASCII 72), turn on the LED:
    if (incomingByte == 'H') {
      digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH);
    }
    // if it's an L (ASCII 76) turn off the LED:
    if (incomingByte == 'L') {
      digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW);
    }
  }
}

Using the blue tooth to turn pin 13 on and off. For now I'm using the Serial monitor in Arduino's IDE. I am under the impression that I can use one of the COM Ports to communicate over blue tooth (though the blue tooth dongle). So far in Windows 8.1 I can connect to the Arduino but I can't [u]stay[/u] connected. Why would it disconnect?

Hope this helps! Let me know if you need more info.

So far in Windows 8.1 I can connect to the Arduino but I can’t stay connected. Why would it disconnect?

As I said before that is what happens when it is not set up correctly. Have you paired the BT module with the PC and given it a trusted status? This should be done from your PC management system.

The 06 module can only be a slave BT device, can the BT in your PC be a master? I would have thought so if it is internal but do you have a dongle on there?

OK, I now realized I had not installed the blue tooth software from disk. Anyway I installed it and I see a few more things in the blue tooth dongle settings but still the same connecting issue. I did notice when I pair the devices the PC says Connected then disconnects (says "Not Connected") then reconnects for just a moment and disconnects again (I don't know for sure if this was happening before I installed the software from disk).

As I said before that is what happens when it is not set up correctly. Have you paired the BT module with the PC and given it a trusted status? This should be done from your PC management system.

I have been pairing the computer with the BT module but I don't know what you mean by giving it a trusted status if that is any different from pairing.

The 06 module can only be a slave BT device, can the BT in your PC be a master? I would have thought so if it is internal but do you have a dongle on there?

According to the page I linked to in my first post the BT module for the arduino will quote: "Support Master and Slave mode, modify by AT commander." I am only beginning with AT commands. Do you know a command to make sure the module is in slave mode?

I don't see where the BT dongle says it is master or slave or can be changed. Here is a link to the BT dongle: http://www.microcenter.com/product/426849/USB-BT400_USB_20_Bluetooth_40_Adapter

but I don't know what you mean by giving it a trusted status if that is any different from pairing.

Once the BT device has paired the PC software should be able to give it a trusted status. This means that it will automatically pair when ever it sees that device. I don't use PC software so I don't know how to access it, but under Linux it is an option you tick.

The act of pairing involves asking for a password and the device echos that back. It looks like the PC is asking, so you see it as being paired but the answer is not being returned so the PC breaks off the connection. You can set this password at the 05 end by using some AT commands. My guess is that both devices are looking for different passwords.