Digital Signal Processing Project Ideas

Hello,

I am required to use Arduino Mega 2560 in conjunction with a DSP course I am taking at my University.

Without going overboard (I currently have 18 credits), I was wondering if anyone could make some good recommendations on what our group should do.

The project needs to demonstrate topics from the course.

Course Topics

  • Sinusoids and Sepctrum Representation
  • Samping
  • Aliasing
  • Digitization
  • FIR Filters
  • Frequency Response of FIR, Z-Transform
  • Z-Transform
  • IIR Filters
  • DFT
  • Spectrum Analysis

From the Project Requirements:

Some Thoughts/Comments

  • • You need a real-time interrupt to read and write data – this was discussed in class – it can be implemented with a external pin and a waveform generator or as a software interrupt
  • • You may need to time the operation of codes – use an external ing an scope
  • • You can interface higher resolution A/D and D/A consider using an I2C interface – libraries are available, and chips are available (google)
  • • You may also use parallel interfaces singe the Mega has a large amount
  • • Be careful of the pins you choose – they are multi function

Idea Link: http://www.instructables.com/id/Arduino-Projects/

  • Report: Sufficient information to describe what you did. For instance for item 1 below, it must show how data flows, the coefficients of the filter, the code you implemented and the magnitude plot etc. About 5 pages.
  • Demonstration: Demonstration about 10-15 minutes on TBD, location to be arranged
  • Grading: this will be weighted as a midterm – you need to stack the deck to get a good grade.

acceptable projects

    • Using an Arduino to implement a frequency nulling filter or IIR filter
    • Real time spectrogram (within limits of A/D processing set) using FFt library
    • Long data sequence filtering (Add-overaly etc) using FFT
    • Touchtone decoder – implement via filters and/or FFT
    • Demonstration must allow one to depress a digit 0-9 as well as # * and create the two tone signal then filter and show the correct digit or symbol
  • • Anything else that demonstrates what was covered in the text and class

  • • if all else fails go to the text website and find a “lab” that is appropriate from the last few chapters

Why doesn't a University DSP course at least provide you with a processor that has DSP instructions so that you can do something reasonably meaningful?
A Teensy3.6 with audio board, for example, would allow some nifty DSP stuff.

Pete

Create a device that can can be used to diagnose the health of bearings on a piece of machinery.

I've never done any DSP and I'm not going to tell you want to do...

There is no built-in DAC. So, no analog output without external hardware.

The 10-bit ADC probably has enough resolution to "demonstrate something" but the ATmega datasheet says you loose resolution above a sample rate of 15kHz so that's another limitation on the signals you can process.

Did you cover anything in your class about processing speed/processing power? My gut-feeling is that the regular Arduino isn't powerful enough for "audio processing" (in addition to the ADC limitations). So, you might need to work at (relatively) lower frequencies. I assume it is powerful enough to filter lower audio frequencies.

People do make audio "spectrum analyzers" with the Arduino and you can find examples on YouTube, but these are spectrum analyzer effects, not a true spectrum analyzer instrument. It might make an acceptable demonstration project.

DVDdoug:
I've never done any DSP and I'm not going to tell you want to do...

There is no built-in DAC. So, no analog output without external hardware.

The 10-bit ADC probably has enough resolution to "demonstrate something" but the ATmega datasheet says you loose resolution above a sample rate of 15kHz so that's another limitation on the signals you can process.

Did you cover anything in your class about processing speed/processing power? My gut-feeling is that the regular Arduino isn't powerful enough for "audio processing" (in addition to the ADC limitations). So, you might need to work at (relatively) lower frequencies. I assume it is powerful enough to filter lower audio frequencies.

People do make audio "spectrum analyzers" with the Arduino and you can find examples on YouTube, but these are spectrum analyzer effects, not a true spectrum analyzer instrument. It might make an acceptable demonstration project.

He mentioned in class about building a DAC manually using the chips we have available in our engineering lab.

We covered processing power in terms of the sampling rate; higher sampling means more processing time.

So are you saying that making a "true spectrum analyzer INSTRUMENT" (after being vetted by the professor of course) would constitute an acceptable demonstration project?

mikb55:
Create a device that can can be used to diagnose the health of bearings on a piece of machinery.

This seems interesting.
Do you have any recommendations on resource information, or should I consult Dr. Google?

mwoj:
This seems interesting.
Do you have any recommendations on resource information, or should I consult Dr. Google?

There are commercial products that do this. See if you can figure out how they work and then try to build something that works the same.