Diy anemometer using IR emitter + receiver questions...

So I'm onto my next project of building an outdoor weather station. I'm hoping to include a weather vane, a DHT11/DHT22 TH sensor and a diy anemometer.

For the anemometer I'm using some sort of spinning cylinder pieces salvage from a VCR with 3 painted dollar store measuring spoons attached at 120° from each other. I've yet to work out a covering but that will come in due time. As for this post I am trying to figure out a way of measuring RPM with what I have on hand.

I've read numerous threads suggesting the use of an IR photodiode + a raw IR emitter or a Hall effect sensor.

I managed to also salvage an IR receiver + emitter from the above mentioned VCR and its accompanying remote.

I have been experimenting with IRLib.h and the accompanying snippet of code that I found on adafruit for detecting breaks. It seems to be working "OK" except that I keep losing the output on my serial monitor. That may be the result of me coding on an old C2D iMac. I say that it seems to be working because I am still seeing feedback from my Nano's built-in LED.

The question is: Can I accurately use this method to calculate the anemometer's RPM?
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Do I have to pony up a couple bucks on eBay and actually buy something?

I haven't even gotten to the weather vane/directional component yet... Hopefully I can find something in need of component recycling that will provide me with the necessary parts for that phase of the project.

TIA,
NothingClever

All calculations require proper wiring and placement of the sensors, and that's up to you. IR sensors should be shielded against daylight. Else it does not matter to the calculations, whether you use IR or hall sensing.

It also depends on your mechanical skills, whether it's easier to buy a ready-made device, with or without sensors, or you can build your own device suitable for outdoor use.

I have no personal experience with the determination of the wind direction. But I could imagine that one or two analog hall sensors, placed below a rotating magnet, could be used for that purpose. The magnet must not be very strong, a magnetized nail may be sufficient with sensitive hall sensors, or with a compass module.

DrDiettrich:
All calculations require proper wiring and placement of the sensors, and that's up to you. IR sensors should be shielded against daylight. Else it does not matter to the calculations, whether you use IR or hall sensing.

It also depends on your mechanical skills, whether it's easier to buy a ready-made device, with or without sensors, or you can build your own device suitable for outdoor use.

I have no personal experience with the determination of the wind direction. But I could imagine that one or two analog hall sensors, placed below a rotating magnet, could be used for that purpose. The magnet must not be very strong, a magnetized nail may be sufficient with sensitive hall sensors, or with a compass module.

Yes, the IR sensors will be shielded from light and all of the other elements. I've already worked out the wiring. The issue I seem to be having is with the IRLib.h zip file linked on adafruit. One of the function calls seems to be acting a bit wonky and not returning data to the serial console after a few "IR breaks". That being said, my Nano's onboard LED is still responsive.