DIY door lock

Hi,

I want to make a Simple door lock for my house gate that i could open using application or radio or rf or whatever i could use

I want to power the components using batteries as there is no power source beside the door, so i want to make its power consumption low as possible, also what is the point of failures i could face, eg. Electricity down or no internet etc

Any ideas what the components and guideline i need to use

This is first time am trying to do projects at home and i need to impress my family :smiley:

Thanks

Kind of a broad question. If you ask 10 Arduino hobbyists that question, you will get 11 answers. All correct.

What is your experience with electronics and the Arduino family of boards?

You might have problems do int that, what you are describing is available for under $100 and it comes with a warranty. Before tackling anything purchase at least 2 (you probably blow one) and try the examples in the IDE, this will help you to understand what it can do. There are a lot of online tutorials etc available to help you. The Arduino Cookbook should be really handy it is a great tool and teacher.

there is a banner up above, marked COMMUNITY. under that banner is a link: PROJECT HUB. there are 64 door locks under PROJECT HUB. find one you like and proceed from there.

KareemWaheed:
I want to make a Simple door lock for my house gate that i could open using application or radio or rf or whatever i could use

First problem. Using wireless of any sort requires power for the receiver. This is necessarily incompatible with battery operation. You may notice that "wireless doorbells" employ the receiver plugged into a power outlet. You may find one with a a battery powered receiver in which case the battery requires replacing every month or two - expensive in the long run and essentially, unreliable.

So if you really want it battery powered, you will need a reasonably sized solar panel to charge it, with a battery sufficient to cope with a few days of rain.

Frankly, a spade and some conduit is generally easier overall!

Next problem - a weatherproof lock mechanism. :astonished:

Paul__B:
First problem. Using wireless of any sort requires power for the receiver. This is necessarily incompatible with battery operation. You may notice that "wireless doorbells" employ the receiver plugged into a power outlet. You may find one with a a battery powered receiver in which case the battery requires replacing every month or two - expensive in the long run and essentially, unreliable.

So if you really want it battery powered, you will need a reasonably sized solar panel to charge it, with a battery sufficient to cope with a few days of rain.

Frankly, a spade and some conduit is generally easier overall!

Next problem - a weatherproof lock mechanism. :astonished:

Paul. You got me to wondering about our battery powered door bell receiver. So I finally got it off the wall. It must be at least 5 years old and has never hat the batteries replaced.
It uses (3) 1.5 volt Alkaline "D" batteries. I have never opened it. So whatever they have in side, it is extremely low power,
I did open it and see three Duracell cells dated MAR 2016.
Two cells are 1.3 volts and one is 1.2 volts. So, next time to COSTCO, will get new cells.
Paul

Paul_KD7HB:
Paul. You got me to wondering about our battery powered door bell receiver. So I finally got it off the wall. It must be at least 5 years old and has never had the batteries replaced.

Any visitors lately?

Run an underground hydraulic line :grinning:

Thanks all for the replies

I have a good programming experience in different fields, and created simple projects using arduino and nodemcu boards

This project i know it is available for commercial use, but i was looking for a practice project that i use something i didn’t use before, as a real life example, like monitor the power and deep sleep modes and wireless communication etc

So i was asking if it will be a good idea and what do i need for that, if we figured out the battery part

Paul_KD7HB:
Paul. You got me to wondering about our battery powered door bell receiver.

You're right, those things last forever. I used to have one, powered by AA batteries (3 or 4, not sure), and it lasted for a year or two with regular visitors. No idea how they do it.
Maybe the circuit is activated by power received through the antenna? (thinking of AM crystal radios, that work fully on wirelessly received power).

Hi,
A simple solution would be to use RFID.
The reader could then be powered up (button) only when you want to unlock.

No WiFi, no Bluetooth needed.

Use a solar panel to keep the batteries topped up.

Tom.... :slight_smile:

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