Do all WiFi shields have similar, if not the same programming?

I'm using DFRobots WiFi shield. I was wondering if this shield has similar programming to other WiFi shields?

I have no idea what I'm doing when adding WiFi capabilities to the Arduino, and just started researching today. I was specifically searching for tutorials on this model of the WiFi shield, and found some documentation on it that seemed pretty in depth. Although, they go into AT mode and AT-STAT mode, and I don't really know what any of that is. At the end of the documentation, they have a sample code that has the shield sleep. I still don't really know what that means.

Is the sample code at the bottom of the link I shared similar to how other WiFi shields are configured?

Thanks!

BayBayMan:
I was wondering if this shield has similar programming to other WiFi shields?

It's completely different from any other WiFi Shield. The communication with the shield is similar to the much more poplar and cheaper ESP8266 shields in that it uses AT commands sent over serial but the actual AT commands are different.

BayBayMan:
found some documentation on it that seemed pretty in depth.

In depth on some things but not the most important: How to actually use the thing! For that they direct you to a forum thread that happens to link to the manufacturer's PDF manual, which is in a repository claiming to be an Arduino library when really it's nothing of the sort. Once you find it the manual seems to be pretty good though.

BayBayMan:
they go into AT mode and AT-STAT mode, and I don't really know what any of that is.

Be careful! It's not "AT mode and AT-STAT mode", it's AP mode and AP+STA mode. Only a couple letters difference but precision is extremely important if you want to be successful with programming and electronics. AP stands for access point. This means you can connect devices directly to the shield over WiFi without the need for an external network. STA stands for station. In station mode you will connect the shield to an access point, such as your WiFi router. AP+STA mode means operating in AP and STA mode.

BayBayMan:
At the end of the documentation, they have a sample code that has the shield sleep. I still don't really know what that means.

The shield will use a lot of power when it's running. This is especially a problem when you're using a battery as a power source for your project. By putting the shield in sleep mode you will drastically reduce the power consumption, but will not be able to use the thing while it's asleep. So if you only need to intermittently use WiFi then you can leave the shield sleeping until you need to communicate over WiFi, then put it back to sleep as soon as you're done.

BayBayMan:
Is the sample code at the bottom of the link I shared similar to how other WiFi shields are configured?

No, it's very specific to that shield. It's only showing how you can control the sleep state and also check the sleep state by writing and reading to specific pins that are connected to the shield. It doesn't demonstrate how to actually use the shield for communication at all. Evidently dfrobot decided that wasn't important information to document. I have a bad feeling about this shield. The price is very high and it doesn't seem that dfrobot has made a real effort to provide good support for it, especially considering the price. I would expect better documentation, example sketches and a library that is compatible with the standard Arduino WiFi library API as much as possible. I think a $7 ESP8266 shield would be a better choice. They are not perfect but you will find much better community support in the form of forum threads, tutorials, libraries, example sketches, and people who can answer your questions. On the other hand, I don't know that the sleep capabilities of the ESP8266 are very good, especially as controlled via AT commands so if that's important to you then the dfrobot shield may be a better choice.

There are other options that may offer higher performance than either the dfrobot or ESP8266 such as the Arduino WiFi 101 Shield. It's a little bit more expensive than the dfrobot but I think the official support will be a little better. I'm not sure about the community support, I don't see it mentioned very often here on the forum.

Wow, I really appreciate you taking the time out to give me such a detailed response!

I had actually just found out that AT & AT+STA should've been AP & AP+STA! I still didn't know what they meant until you described them. Thanks for that! It makes more sense now! I was just blindly following along that tutorial, not knowing exactly what they were making me do.

I've been doing a bit more research on some WiFi specific topics, and am learning a lot more. I've also noticed DFRobot isn't supporting this shield very well, either. They have plenty of comments asking for better support, and it looks like some of that support is hard to find still. I'm looking at their forums for help on this specific shield, and found many people in my position. Trying to find any kind of documentation is pretty hard, and I don't think I can intuitively create what I need to with this shield. I'm gonna try looking for that user manual, and see what they offer. Hopefully it helps a bit more.

I didn't do enough research beforehand on this shield, or other shields. I saw that the official Arduino WiFi shield was a bit hard to find, so I went with something that was easily accessible. Now that I am having trouble with all this, I really should have looked for the WiFi Shield 101. I would be willing to pay that price, instead of using this. Thanks for letting me know my options, Pert!

I'm gonna try a few things to see if I can get it working. Thanks again, Pert!!

I somehow missed that you already had the shield (even though it was the first sentence of your post!). I think you'll be able to get it working, no problem. Just use the manual found at that linked forum thread as a guide to the AT commands:
https://github.com/Arduinolibrary/DFRobot_wifi_shield_V3/raw/master/USR-WIFI232%20Low%20Power%20WiFi%20Module%20User%20Manual%20V2.4.pdf

Thanks to you, Pert, I can finally think about other questions. I am now looking into AT commands, and reading the entire user manual, well only the parts that apply to my WiFi module. You're making me a better researcher, and I plan to pass that knowledge about!

I'm gonna look more into AT commands, as I don't have much of a grasp on them. There is still so much for me to learn!

AT commands are just an arbitrary communication protocol commonly used for serial communications. The AT stands for "attention", it just tells the chip on the WiFi shield "listen up, the text following this is going to be a command". The AT part is a common convention that goes back decades at least to the days of serial landline modems but the commands that follow are just whatever the firmware authors decided to use.