Does anyone understand the Arduino product range strategy?

Every time I stumble upon an interesting board in the official product lineup I find that it's marked as 'retired'.

There seems to be a constant churn of new products that don't stick around for more than a couple of years. There's a good chance that a board you buy today will be obsolete and permanently "out of stock" before you have even completed a project using it.

The only stable products are the ancient low end models that continue to be priced at a level that makes no sense given the plethora of clones and alternatives that have more capabilities, such as the ESP range, the Teensy or the Arduino compatible abstraction layers offered by TI or ST.

Looking at the Arduino store today there are 20+ boards. I have no idea what niches in the market half of them are supposed to fill. How many of those will still exist a year from now?

the arduino.org boards are retired https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arduino#Trademark_dispute

Juraj: the arduino.org boards are retired https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arduino#Trademark_dispute

What a mess, the org Due and the ethernet shield were discontinued then later revived as cc products. The Leonardo eth never returned, so for a time there was no ethernet support for any cc products. To this day there are no cc products with ethernet on the main board.

To this day there are no cc products with ethernet on the main board.

Most likely, very few people are interested in buying one. Sensibly so.

mikb55:
What a mess, the org Due and the ethernet shield were discontinued then later revived as cc products.
The Leonardo eth never returned, so for a time there was no ethernet support for any cc products.
To this day there are no cc products with ethernet on the main board.

the Ethernet+SD libraries take almost all flash and RAM of ATmega328 or 32u4.