Does it matter for the Arduino Nano if I put 1000pF instead of a 0.1uF cap?

I made a mistake and ordered the wrong part (1000pF instead of 0.1uF) for all 4 ceramic capacitors on the Arduino Nano design.

I already built my prototype and it's working fine. But now the assembly house see that the value in my BOM is not the same as the actual component (kudos for them to notice that).

Should I tell them to go ahead with the 1000pF and is it critical?

That’s pretty far off. 1000pF is 1nF. .1uF is 100nF or 100,000pF.

But they are used as filters.... what can go wrong if I use 1000pF instead of100000pF?

szangvil: But they are used as filters.... what can go wrong if I use 1000pF instead of100000pF?

Impedance, by a factor of 100. They won't filter the noise you are trying to get rid of nearly as well. And for timing purposes like when connected between the RESET pin of the CPU and the DTR pin of an FTDI type serial interface, it probably won't work reliably, if at all.

The DTR and reset timing might be an issue. Although I did build the prototype and it works fine...

Does it matter for the Arduino Nano if I put 1000pF instead of a 0.1uF cap?

Well, the answer is not easy. Experts know an 1nF capacitor might be a better choice than an 100nF for a specific application.. The issue is the capacitor's impedance is complex and includes resistive and inductive parts as well. So the 1nF cap (small L, bigger R) could filter fast transients much better than the 100n (larger L, smaller R). There is a lot of guides on that topic available, big guys use a parallel combination, for example:

100p || 10n || 1u 1n || 100n || 10u

etc., in order to create a quality decoupling.

The original design is a 4.7uF tantalum cap in parallel with a 0.1uF ceramic cap...

Typical filtering ranges (where the capacitive Xc prevails and therefore decouples well) AFAIK are:

100uF-1000uF ... up to few kHZ
10uF-100uF alu ... up to ~10kHZ
10uF-100uF tantalum ... up to ~100kHZ
1uF-22uF multilayer ceramics... up to ~few MHZ
100nF ceramic ... up to ~10MHz
10nF ceramic ... up to ~100MHz
1nF ceramic ... up to ~0.5GHz+
10pF-100pf ceramic ... up to ~few GHz

It depends on actual capacitor's material and shape - how it will work at those frequencies, of course. So you have to combine several capacitors in parallel in order to filter out your frequency range of choice.. ;)