Double Home door bell

Hi, I want to make a door bell for our two-generation house. It should even contain two way voice communication and control of electromagnetic door lock. The thing is we don't have enough cables routed for it to be wired connection.

So I plan to use condenser microphone with 16-bit ADC to communicate with arduino via High-speed I2C. Thus data then would be send with ESP8266-01.
On the other end it would be practically the same and for the speaker I would use 16-bit I2C DAC (DAC8571).

Can someone confirm if this would work or suggest better way of doing this?

Thanks for every answer to this thread.

Sounds like a job for a couple of Pi Zero W. :grinning:

How many cables do you have wired?

The thing is we don't have enough cables routed for it to be wired connection.

I work in telecoms. Telephones use 2 wires. Many telephone systems also have door intercom capability built in, also using 2 wires. A door release needs only 2 wires. Given the above, would a small telephone system with door intercom do the job with the wires you have?

I suspect a condenser microphone will never be weather proof and will be extremely hard to find as they are technology from the 1950's. They also need a lot of electronics to convert varying capacitance to a voltage.

Paul

Paul_KD7HB:
I suspect a condenser microphone will never be weather proof and will be extremely hard to find as they are technology from the 1950's. They also need a lot of electronics to convert varying capacitance to a voltage.

You're a wag! :grinning:

Condenser microphones are now the most common microphones in everyday use.

They are "self-exciting" condenser microphones called "electrets". :sunglasses:

Paul__B:
You're a wag! :grinning:

Condenser microphones are now the most common microphones in everyday use.

They are "self-exciting" condenser microphones called "electrets". :sunglasses:

Look at the history again! They were also also called ribbon microphones and were an actual capacitor with one moveable plate. The plate was moved by the sound pressure. Much higher fidelity that any other microphone of the time.

Paul

With 2 wires (ground and data) and a controller at both ends it should be possible to switch the data line to voice at both ends and then back to data to do with serial what was done with more wires. Not a simple thing for sure.

Voice can be sent with Arduino-short interruptions (less than a milli) and still be clear if they're not too frequent.

A 3rd wire would make all that moot.

Paul_KD7HB:
Look at the history again! They were also also called ribbon microphones and were an actual capacitor with one moveable plate. The plate was moved by the sound pressure.

Nope!

Look up Wikipedia on a ribbon microphone. The ribbon microphone was indeed very popular due to the excellent frequency response of the lightweight and very flexible diaphragm, but it is a “dynamic” microphone using electromagnetic induction (like a “dynamo”, thus the name).

GoForSmoke:
With 2 wires (ground and data) and a controller at both ends it should be possible to switch the data line to voice at both ends and then back to data to do with serial what was done with more wires. Not a simple thing for sure.

And yet telephones have been doing exactly this since Almon B Strowger invented automatic telephony in 1889.

Using rotary clicks and later on dial tones.

With what I describe the users would hear be few miniscule dropouts, one per button press and nothing from data goes to click or beep.

It might be easier to use dialtone devices (encoder/decoder?).

Hi,
Welcome to the forum.
Please read the post at the start of any forum , entitled "How to use this Forum".
OR
http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php/topic,148850.0.html.

Can you post a block diagram of how you envisage your project please?
I2C is designed as an on board component comms system, not for long distance comms.
Have you looked at the ESP32?

Thanks.. Tom... :slight_smile: