Drive proportional Solenoid of Gas Valve

Hi, i want to control 2 proportional solenoid of a Gas Valve. The Solenoid is THIS. I wanted to use a L298 Motor Driver, does it work?

I very much doubt it for the following resons :

a) the valve is a DC analogue valve (smooth dc signal)
b) the device driver produces a digital PWM output
c) the device driver input current may exceed the output capability of your micro control device

Ähm, realy? What you sugest to do?

I think it will work just fine. The PWM won't make any difference to that solenoid.

To be extra safe, you might use a lower input voltage. For example 9V with the nominal 13V white coil or 5V with the nominal 15V blue coil. That will ensure you can't exceed the maximum current specified.

I wanted to use the green (28VDC) whit 24VDC... If i dont aply higher voltage than 28 it should not be a problem ist that true?

MorganS:
I think it will work just fine. The PWM won’t make any difference to that solenoid.

To be extra safe, you might use a lower input voltage. For example 9V with the nominal 13V white coil or 5V with the nominal 15V blue coil. That will ensure you can’t exceed the maximum current specified.

The issue is whether the valve has laminated magnetic stack or not. If its laminated it will
handle current ripple without lots of heating due to eddy currents. If its just soft iron it
will heat up due to eddy currents from the ripple and analog drive is needed.

Ever seen a transformer with a shorted turn secondary? Bad news.

I suspect only by finding details of the W9335 control unit designed for that valve will
you determine whether PWM is sensible or not. Or by trying it and checking for heat
build-up and excessive current.

MarkT:
I suspect only by finding details of the W9335 control unit designed for that valve will

I tried looking for something similar some years ago.

Manufacturers are not keen to share i found.

MorganS:
To be extra safe, you might use a lower input voltage. For example 9V with the nominal 13V white coil or 5V with the nominal 15V blue coil. That will ensure you can't exceed the maximum current specified.

Well that certainly doesn't make sense. If the coil is rated at 13volts then it will take 13 volts until the cows come home. If you are going for PWM then the 28volt coil you are looking at will be rated for 28 volts and by design your PWM should function so that at 100% setting it outputs 28volts (or 24 if you wish)

The device is obviously a linear controlled valve such that the more energy applied to the coil the further open the pressure regulating valve is set. You will notice the current range is (for the green coil) specified as 30 to 165mA. Coil resistance is a nominal 125 ohms which at 165mA of current requires 20.6volts. So 24 volts of drive might be enough. At 30mA the drive required is 3.75volts.

From a control viewoint, the current range of 30 to 165mA is fairly close to the universal analogue control span ratio of 5:1, be is 1-5volts, 10-50mA, 4-20mA, 3-15psi, 10-50mB etc. So I surmise my claim that the device is a linear regulator using an analogue current operating over a set range is valid.

It may work using PWM but I'm sure it certainly isn't designed to do so. Unlike a motor you will not be able to use a snubber diode without affecting it's linearity and that may then throw up a whole new set of problems with your driver board.

My recommendation is to find a linear analogue driver that converts a PWM input signal into a smooth variable analogue output current.

The way I read those specs, the 13V is only nominal. The maximum current specified will be exceeded with 13V DC. The "15V" coil is even worse. 50 ohms resistance and only 250mA

jackrae:
The device is obviously a linear controlled valve such that the more energy applied to the coil the further

Are you sure about that ?

It may be linear once the recommended controller is attached though.

I had the opportunity to play with some a few years back, with the idea of using them for pneumatic applications.

Could not discover how exactly they worked though.

With any modulating control device the voltage rating of the device is always greater than the actual control range.
So for the 15 volt coil with a nominal resistance of 50 ohms and a control span 50 to 250mA the actual modulation voltage is between 2.5 volts and 12.5 volts. Such dead ends are intentionally chosen since no simple control device can be truly predictable from zero to maximum.
As far as control is concerned, this device, even if marketed by a company such as Honeywell, appears to be somewhat crude. The calibration procedure tends to suggest it also has rather an unrepeatable (unpredictable) operation that is very dependant upon gas operating pressure.

jackrae:
The calibration procedure tends to suggest it also has rather an unrepeatable (unpredictable) operation that is very dependant upon gas operating pressure.

This is what i found, i wondered if it/they were faulty.

Useless for my application anyway.

This guy has a valve that would appear to be designed for PWM control for hydraulics.

Please excuse the recursion.