Driving LEDs with TLC5926 LED drivers using Arduino Pro Mini board(s)

This is literally my first day getting to know arduinos and their fascinating world, and I'm yet quite all over the place with all this information. So my plan for the first project is to use arduino kind of board, like a good example is Arduino Pro Mini, and and the build a few more using the tutorial from this site http://www.instructables.com/id/YABBAS-Yet-Another-Bare-Bones-Arduino-on-Stripb/ The LEDs I bought from here http://www.aliexpress.com/snapshot/6157987022.html , and I actually got 200 of them (hope they works after a month of shipping), and hopely every led can be put to a need.

So, 1: How many boards/drivers are needed to drive these poor little things individually, but the boards together with something like an arduino IDE? 2: Is this note (This design uses a 1k (instead of 10k, resistor for the power indicator LED, (this is from the www.instuctables.com)), something I should have my eye on, I want to make the LEDs as bright as possible, if this sentence is related to it. 3: Which is the easiest way to form the LEDs in a circle form, or a half-sphere, if it is not too vague. Do I need to stack them like some of the youtube projects are done like with the cubes, or is there certain type of breadboards for this assembly? This is all I urge to know, Thank you!

This is literally my first day getting to know arduinos

OK so learn this. Instructables are 98% crap never ever trust what they say.

You do not need loads of boards to drive loads of LEDs you need one board and several drivers. The chip MAX7219 will drive 64 LEDs and you can chain several chips together.

This link tells you something about them http://playground.arduino.cc/Main/MAX72XXHardware

There are many other solutions too.

It is never good when a supplier's pictures does not match the product's description. On that link either the picture is wrong or they are not RGB LEDs. What are you expecting?

God damn it... The description really wasn't that well written, and I totally missed the last photo, shouldn't have been in that great hurry. So it's a blinker! It emits RG, and RGB as patterns, from 3 d-i-s-c-r-e-t-e conductors... Discrete was totally a new word for my vocubulary. How are all the instructables crap? If there is 50 good comments, are they all lying? This is what I don't personally understand, or what is that about?

God damn it... The description really wasn't that well written, and I totally missed the last photo, shouldn't have been in that great hurry. So it's a blinker! It emits RG, and RGB as patterns, from 3 d-i-s-c-r-e-t-e conductors... Discrete was totally a new word for my vocubulary. How are all the instructables crap? If there is 50 good comments, are they all lying? This is what I don't personally understand, or what is that about?

What are you trying to say here ? (besides your question about the Instructables , which is a waste of time. You should form your own conclusion about them. I don't care for the fact that they rarely include schematics but have nevertheless found them useful)

As far as everything else you said here:

So it's a blinker!

I don't know what you mean by this. It is a led. There is nothing "blinky" about it. It goes on if you turn it on or off if you turn it off so what you mean by "blinker" is not clear.

It emits RG, and RGB as patterns, from 3 d-i-s-c-r-e-t-e conductors..

https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=discrete%20definition

It has three "discrete" junctions (not conductors, which is wire or traces) and each are made with different materials resulting in different wavelengths:

https://www.google.com/search?q=rgb+led+wavelength&espv=2&biw=1364&bih=657&tbm=isch&imgil=UpPjbHVTgRhEtM%253A%253BmtHX_JizprdyKM%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.jands.com.au%25252Fsupport%25252Fproduct_support%25252Flighting_technical_materials%25252Fwhat_to_look_for_when_judging_an_led_fixture146s_colour_mixing_capabilities133&source=iu&pf=m&fir=UpPjbHVTgRhEtM%253A%252CmtHX_JizprdyKM%252C_&usg=__02RBqZEZyAhMrNTRUgWBYJ6dVAI%3D&dpr=1.25&ved=0CCkQyjc&ei=fFckVKGMJMiYoQTnsoLYDg#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=MMSe7S_z161XdM%253A%3BtIKD6_qgViya5M%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.ecse.rpi.edu%252F~schubert%252FLight-Emitting-Diodes-dot-org%252Fchap12%252FF12-16%252520RGB%252520emission%252520spectrum.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.ecse.rpi.edu%252F~schubert%252FLight-Emitting-Diodes-dot-org%252Fchap12%252Fchap12.htm%3B975%3B413

Incidently, if you have heard of an RGB color computer monitor then you understand that combining these three colors in a single led is potentially the equivilent of a single pixel of an RGB monitor in that with the right combination of current through the three leads, you can create almost any color.

[u]From WS2812 datasheet[/u]

Each pixel of the three primary color can achieve 256 brightness display, completed 16,777,216 (24-bit) color full color display, and scan frequency not less than 400Hz/s.

[u]WS2812 datasheet[/u] http://www.adafruit.com/datasheets/WS2812.pdf

How are all the instructables crap? If there is 50 good comments, are they all lying? This is what I don't personally understand, or what is that about?

No, they are not lying. Consider the source of your information. Do you think someone with 30 or 40 years experience is going to waste their time with an instructable ? Do you to to ToysRUS to learn about technology ? The Instructables are for beginners, which is probably why they rarely include schematics because so few people who use them can read a schematic. Form your own opinion. If you need the "Idiot's guide to "_____", then an Instructable is right for you. If you have a BSEET, or BSEE, or similar, you probably are not going to use them.

Instructables are crap because most of them are very bad circuits that either over stress the components or fundamentally missunderstand electronics. The comments saying it is good are mainly done by people who have very little knowlage themselves and have managed to get something working in the same hit and miss way as the writer. That one you linked to is bad because of the lack of proper power supply decoupling. You might not notice at first but this makes it prone to interference that will bite you further down the line.

We often get people here who have damaged their arduino following an instructables post, or fail to get it to work. Getting a circuit that will work reliably and that you can make hundreds of is a diffrent matter than making something that appears to function.

Grumpy_Mike: Instructables are crap

Yep. Most of them seem to just connect wires together randomly until "it works!"