Driving piezeo at 113 KHz for ultrasonic mist maker

Hi people. I have recently brought one of these: http://bit.ly/2vIhPIj It works well, but to do what I want I need to be running it at a higher voltage than the PCB supplied can handle. Putting a 24V DC power supply into the PCB has the piezeo perform as I want, but the PCB then quickly heats up, flashes brightly and leaves burn marks on my desk.

So I am looking to build something that can supply a 113 KHz frequency at 24V, or higher.

I have so far managed to control the PWM frequency on my arduino using the following code, but I cannot supply enough current or voltage to run the piezeo:

#include <PWM.h>

//use pin 11 on the Mega instead, otherwise there is a frequency cap at 31 Hz
int led = 9;                // the pin that the LED is attached to
int brightness = 127.5;         // how bright the LED is
int32_t frequency = 113000; //frequency (in Hz)

void setup()
{
  //initialize all timers except for 0, to save time keeping functions
  InitTimersSafe(); 

  //sets the frequency for the specified pin
  bool success = SetPinFrequencySafe(led, frequency);
  
  //if the pin frequency was set successfully, turn pin 13 on
  if(success) {
    pinMode(13, OUTPUT);
    digitalWrite(13, HIGH);    
  }
}

void loop()
{
  //use this functions instead of analogWrite on 'initialized' pins
  pwmWrite(led, brightness);
  
}

If you can suggest any wave to achieve this it would be very much appreciated. Also the greater current that can be handled the better, as it means I could run multiple piezeos off of one circuit, rather than needing a new one each time.

NOTE: I am very new to arduinos and electrical components in general and so am not yet at the stage where I can understand more complex things (although I will try my best and google stuff). So if anyone could provide specific instructions on things to try (e.g. try this code or wire these specific components like this to do this) that would be immensely appreciated.

Thanks for taking the time to read this. Anyone who can help out will be a real life saver.

dabble:
Hi people. I have recently brought one of these: http://bit.ly/2vIhPIj It works well, but to do what I want I need to be running it at a higher voltage than the PCB supplied can handle. Putting a 24V DC power supply into the PCB has the piezeo perform as I want, but the PCB then quickly heats up, flashes brightly and leaves burn marks on my desk.

What part of the PCB fries? I would suspect it’s U1 (78L05) which looks like a rather small 5V voltage regulator. Maybe if you replace that with a buck converter that can produce 5V from your 24V supply the rest of the circuit could handle the 24V. As a test you can remove the regulator and supply +5V from a separate supply (like a USB charger).
If some other part died it could possibly be replaced with a component capable of supporting the higher current and voltage.