DRV8711 high current stepper driver

Hi, A long while ago @MarkT had mentioned the use of TI's DRV8711 full bridge drivers for working with high current stepper motors. Wanted to check with @MarkT is there is there any feedback on the commercial viability of this driver, cause I remember you asking about it on another forum. Did you get any far in building a production version of this? I only ask cause one of my customers is looking for a relatively similar build and needs high current and voltage stepper drivers. Something in the range of 9A and 75V. I had really liked the 8711 since it has a 256 step indexer. This and the high voltage means that the stepper can achieve rapid speeds.

There are stepper driver boards on the market that use TB66xx driver chips that can drive 3 amp motors IIRC.

...R

Robin2:
There are stepper driver boards on the market that use TB66xx driver chips that can drive 3 amp motors IIRC.

...R

But they use a huge heatsink - the DRV8711 avoids that by using discrete MOSFETs which can be
far lower on-resistance (20 to 100 times less).

No, I haven't done anything about this - somewhere there's a thread which might even have some code of
mine for settting it up via SPI.

The TI board is reasonably cheap BTW.

Technically its a current-controlled microstepping chopper driver, not just a "full bridge driver". Uses
8 external MOSFETs (4 dual SOIC8 mosfets work well, no heatsink for 5A is completely doable, perhaps
bigger mosfets for 10A would be necessary)

Robin2:
There are stepper driver boards on the market that use TB66xx driver chips that can drive 3 amp motors IIRC.

...R

Yes I know. I crowdfunded one (shameless promotion!). As good as they are and they go upto 4A and the voltage is 40V. These are great for NEMA 23/34 low inductance motors that are typically available in that range. Would work really well with Shapoko, XCarve and OX CNC kind of machines and possibly also the G0704 converted mills. Like Mark said you do require a beefy heatsink or the junction temperatures on those could easily reach 100+ deg C. They are nifty drivers though.

I needed something far more industrial.

MarkT:
But they use a huge heatsink - the DRV8711 avoids that by using discrete MOSFETs which can be
far lower on-resistance (20 to 100 times less).

No, I haven't done anything about this - somewhere there's a thread which might even have some code of
mine for settting it up via SPI.

The TI board is reasonably cheap BTW.

Technically its a current-controlled microstepping chopper driver, not just a "full bridge driver". Uses
8 external MOSFETs (4 dual SOIC8 mosfets work well, no heatsink for 5A is completely doable, perhaps
bigger mosfets for 10A would be necessary)

True since it also incorporates an indexer. I'm planning to make my own board using an STM32 MCU, though an Arduino Uno would work just fine. I just wanted to get more hands on those and I also planned on adding a display to make them standalone devices. Thank you for your library. I did find your code and I'll go through that as well. I don't understand a lot of pure CPP and Arduino abstraction is more my cup of tea. I also found a high voltage reference design of the 8711 and that looks very interesting. I will keep posting here more often as I build on this.

Currently I am developing a 4 axis drive board thats driven with the 8711's pushing a bunch of T0220 mounted IRFZ44 which delivers alot more drive current then the typical cheap under 4amp boards that are so plentiful.

Actually i am surprised that theres not more developers looking into the DRV8711's as a cost effective way of designing higher current drivers more suited to the nema23' and 34s which are more usable for bigger designs.

Ive got a prototype machine i built thats able to do 3d printer with 4 colors using a bunch of nema 23 425 oz motors that draw around 4.2 per phase that i originally had running on a bunch of TB6600 that kept crapping out and i came to realize that theres not much available in the mid level drivers thats very cost effective.

Sofar the only drawback ive seen is they need to be initialized via spi which for my purposes works great but as for a plug and play thing with the current level of Ramps and other typical driver boards is problematic. My system consists of a 4 motor control board running grbl with a few mods and then i have a 6 motor extruder board running up to 6 extruders with the largest nema 17 motors. each board has its on mcu and then the whole system is controlled via a beaglebone black.

For anyone that likes to play tho the drv8711's are well worth looking at...

TO220's aren't necessary for 5A, my board uses 4 dual MOSFETs in SOIC8 packages and no heatsink.
Quite large steppers can be driven with 5A or so, and only needing a couple of square inches of board
area and no heatsink is handy. 8 TO220's must take up a fair amount of room.

Been awhile as i forgot i posted here... lol....

Ya for those motors i actually got away using the fets that come on the booster boards themselves and built an array of 6 boosters being controlled from a Beaglebone Black. The TO220 packages where more in the interest of higher amperage motors and wanting a replaceable fet package while developing the system i was designing...

In the end ive designed a module that contains each drive in a small enclosure that goes on the motor at the motor location and each motor is networked back to a main control board i am using to drive them...

Interesting - do you have pictures?