Durability/Reliability

Looking for a little help deciding what device. One of the engineers I work with wants to use the Arduino Uno to control an industrial wire dereeler but I'm concerned about the life expectancy of the Arduino. This is a device that will be running 24 hours a day for 6 days a week. Will that constant use cause an issue with the Arduino? Do I need to be concerned about heat? It will be running a stepper motor, a servo, and a few LEDs.

Thank you, George

The microcontroller chip is rated to 85C. If the stepper & servo are powered in parallel with the Arduino (and not getting power From the Arduino) then the Arduino will run pretty cool. Do you need USB connectivity the whole time? If not, I would suggest a USB/Serial adapter to program & debug a Promini, then let the promini run standalone from a 5V DC wallwart supply connected to Vcc/Gnd. Fewer parts = less parts to fail. Wires can be soldered right to the board also. You can also buy automotive temperature range parts (125C) and build up a custom card such as one of mine so you know the ratings of all parts (and not many are needed - the 328, crystal, two 22pf caps, 10K resistor, 0.1uF caps (some parts go on the backside). 1x6 header for programming for programming via ICSP, and whatever you need for connections to your parts. Or, mod this a little to be custom for your needs, wouldn't take much. http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/ATMEGA328P-15AZ/ATMEGA328P-15AZCT-ND/2477177 http://www.crossroadsfencing.com/BobuinoRev17/

One of the engineers I work with wants to use the Arduino Uno to control an industrial wire dereeler but I'm concerned about the life expectancy of the Arduino.

The most problematic are always connectors and other "mechanical stuff" (mechanical wear, oxidation, dust). The original Arduino connectors are NOT the best for an industrial application. An example: I have a transceiver, made by well known maker, the first issue I delt with were the fuses sockets contacts oxidation (heavy cleaning needed), the second was the broken push button (the very same as the arduino's reset).

Reset button is rarely needed. I might connect one temporarily during testing if there is chance the RX pin might be used as an output and serial programming is needed.