Efficient way to route? (Se image)

First of all, my project is to make a "box" in the basement with:

  • LCD display that shows humidity and temperature in the room (DHT22).
  • Manual operation of a relay that turns on/off heater (Blynk).
  • RGB LED that shows difference states.
  • LDR sencor that turns off LCD backlight when i not in the room (when the light is off)
  • An internal temperature sensor that messure heat inside the box and give me a message via Blynk when the temperature is too high (DS18B20)

PS! Under the board i have two rails. One for all +5v and one for all GND. All elements on the picture includet ESP32 will be powered by the 5V external power.

Allt that works on breadboard and the code is fine. But i think i have been thinking a little fast and forgotten that all this must connect together. I'm thing the space i tight... ?

All connections and soldering going to happend under the board. Sensors wil be connected to the contacts you se on the picure over later.

Nothing on the parts on the board is soldered and just put there for now.

Question is how i should route all the wires. I'm going ti use 0.7mm copper wire for routing and if it's get too cramped i have to solder wires directly.

I need som tips and tricks here, and maby also some suggestions on how i should place the parts on the board.

Qustion 2:

Maybe a silly question, but is it preferred to route all +5v and GND under the board to the same place? Or is it okey to just route the wire to nearest +5v and GND?

It’s should be fine to connect to the nearest rail. When routing ground it’s best to have a large plane or use a star configuration so the ground potential is kept the same. So don’t route ground from one to the other in series rather try to keep it parallel to a common rail. When prototyping we do what we have to get it done.

wolframore:
It’s should be fine to connect to the nearest rail. When routing ground it’s best to have a large plane or use a star configuration so the ground potential is kept the same. So don’t route ground from one to the other in series rather try to keep it parallel to a common rail. When prototyping we do what we have to get it done.

Thanks for good information :slight_smile:

Somebody inn her sead that it's okay if you just ground thing together. But you mean that we should keep the ground points together i one place?

Bjerknez:
Thanks for good information :slight_smile:

Somebody inn her sead that it's okay if you just ground thing together. But you mean that we should keep the ground points together i one place?

Again, the environment really matters. If you are only dealing with DC return and not signal return, then any type arrangement is ok.

If mixing DC and signal return, then the star connection is best.

If dealing with LARGE dc currents, then keep their returns together in a separate star connection, with a single connection to the signal ground. Large DC ground returns will cause a signal on the signal return if there is a rapid change in the large dc current.

And probably more!

Paul

This is harder than i first thought.

I can't focuse my head to get started with tracing of this board:

It's a double sided board with throw hole traces.

I know how to trace, but im not shure how i can make an most efficient route.

If somebody could do some marking on image over to give me a kickstart regards to ground and power lines i would have appreciated that.

is it important to wire the input power to the board first, and after that wire power to sensors and leds etc? Or is it just to connect power together?

On the image you see 3 led contacts with resistor, and a DS18B20" temperature sensor. It is to rails in the down right corner on the board i planned to use for 5V and Ground, but i'm not shure i really need them...?

See post #47 and 48

Verry good larryd :slight_smile:

But is,nt 30awg insulated and 38awg uninsulatet wire a little too tin? Can a 38/30awg wire handle current around 4-500mA?

When i solder routes i have used 0.7mm copper wire. Maybe too much?

Insulated wire wrap wire (30AWG) works fine for digital switching signals.

For higher current portions of the circuit, use heavier gauge hookup wire including uninsulated busbar wire.

You can make your own busbar wire by stripping ‘tinned solid’ #22AWG wire.

For short length circuit board wiring, 30AWG wire is good for 500-800mA.

Okay. I have just 22 awg for all wiring in my earlier project. But offcourse its easyer with thinner wires.

I have many roles with 30awg wrapping wire, but it is so thin that i am scared to brake them off when i accidently toutch them. 22awg is much more solid.

Thanks for good answers :slight_smile:

Btw. I love your tips and tricks posts. I'm sure you know what you talking about :slight_smile: