Electrical Harmonics Experimentation

Hello,

I'm new to arduino (and electronics for that matter) but I have a hunch and want to start to use the computer board to do some experimentation using harmonics with electrical signal generation.

I've seen you can buy signal generator boards (although I don't know which one(s) to use) on aliexpress but I need to be able do the following:

  1. I need to be able to vary the frequencies and voltages of the signals programmatically, creating a looping effect for experimentation, is this possible?
  2. In order to combine 2 or more signals (to create the harmonics), how many signal generator boards will I need? And, how should I connect them together to produce harmonics effects?
  3. What do I need to avoid doing to avoid damage of the circuits?

Any help/advice will be greatly appreciated.

If you are interested in audio frequencies [u]Audacity[/u] can generate sine, square, and sawtooth “tones” on your computer, and of course you czn play the sounds through your soundcard. You can mix the waveforms and display a spectrum or spectrogram.

Thanks, interesting idea but unfortunately, I want to experiment with electrical harmonics and not audio harmonics.

, I want to experiment with electrical harmonics and not audio harmonics.

What is the difference between these two? I don’t know any.

In order to combine 2 or more signals (to create the harmonics)

A single signal can contain many harmonics.

One place to start reading and learning more about harmonics is here. While studying these ideas, you should also learn about the Superposition Principle.

One place to start reading and learning more about harmonics is here. While studying these ideas, you should also learn about the Superposition Principle.

Is that the same superpostion that Quantum Mechanics refers to?

Combining two or more signals create "products", not harmonics.

Paul

Is that the same superpostion that Quantum Mechanics refers to?

Briefly discussed in the provided link.

Thanks for your inputs, all appreciated.

The difference for me between audio harmonics and electrical harmonics is that I can't use audio harmonics in an electrical circuit after the generation process which is what I want to experiment on as I want to experiment with an electrolysis process. Unless someone here knows how to breakdown liquid molecules using sound. Probably possible but probably not very efficient and potentially dangerous for your hearing.

I am a novice, that shows in the terms that I've used, but willing to learn and like learning unconventionally, i.e. real life experimentation to see what really happens rather than just based on text books.

Any advice on the equipment I can use and how to do appreciated.

Really hard to offer advice on equipment when what you are thinking is not what you are writing. Words are kind of important to communication.

Paul

Thanks but when it gets to the sarcasm stage (there's no need for it) I'll figure it out myself. Thanks all for your input. Hope you have a pleasant day.

The point is that "audio" harmonics start life as what you call electrical harmonics i.e. electrical signals, and they go through all the circuits that way until finally they meet a loudspeaker and turn into sound.

So you can work with "audio" signals. A 50Hz sine wave "audio" signal is identical to the waveform of 50Hz mains power. At the end of the day just connect it to whatever it is you're trying to drive instead of to a loudspeaker.

Now exactly what sort of harmonics do you want to use. E.g. a square wave has a good set of odd numbered harmonics, a sawtooth has both odd and even harmonics.

Steve

imamushroom:
Thanks but when it gets to the sarcasm stage (there's no need for it) I'll figure it out myself. Thanks all for your input. Hope you have a pleasant day.

No sarcasm intended. Just that words used are important for communication.

Paul

to see what really happens rather than just based on text books

Science text books summarize a couple of thousand years of people doing experiments, and then figuring out why things happen the way they do, beginning with the ancient Greeks.

You are welcome to start over, though!

jremington:
Science text books summarize a couple of thousand years of people doing experiments, and then figuring out why things happen the way they do, beginning with the ancient Greeks.

You are welcome to start over, though!

Sometimes people ‘start over’ and discover something new. There was a German bloke called Albert* who did this around the beginning of the 20th Century, he made big improvements to our knowledge of gravity, mass, velocity and time as a result. Never discourage anyone from questioning accepted science.

Apart from that, text books can be dull and boring, much better to experiment yourself and see how stuff really works.

*Fortunately not eaten by a lion when a boy.

Never discourage anyone from questioning accepted science.

Are you a fan of crystal healing, or one of the anti-vaxxers?

PerryBebbington:
Never discourage anyone from questioning accepted science.

But the trick to questioning accepted science in a sensible and useful fashion is first to learn what the accepted science says and why. Then you're in a position to question it.

Unfortunately that's a step that takes a fair amount of intelligence and generally a good few years. That's probably why many people seem to avoid it and instead prefer to start from something like "I don't see why (insert favourite daft idea here) shouldn't work/be true" never realising that they're simply demonstrating their own ignorance.

Steve

@slipstick. Thank you for your explanation. I wasn't aware that Audacity could do this sort of thing and sounds like a good place to start. If i can program it, even better but I need to investigate that. However, how would I get the signal out of my computer to the anodes and cathodes of the electrolysis process. Presumably, I'd need some sort of amplification or interface board to do this, again presumably via the computers USB port or head phone socket.

@jremington. I hear and appreciate what you are saying and I've heard it before in other fields that I've done work in when there I challenge conventional thinking too. Lets just say that in that field, they were wrong!

Lets just say that in that field, they were wrong!

That is certainly very reassuring. Keep up the excellent work.

However, how would I get the signal out of my computer to the anodes and cathodes of the electrolysis process.

You should use a digital to analogue converter followed by an amplifier to boost the signal to the voltage and current you require. Do you know what you need here?