"Electronic Design" magazine archive

Bit of a long-shot here, but does anyone have access to the "Electronic Design" magazine (the one Bob Pease used to have a column in) archive?

I'm looking for a series of designs for solid-state anemometers submitted by a reader.

All I can remember about the articles is that the writer was a US academic, and the designs typically used four transistors arranged on a flat plate at the apexes of a triangle, with one in the centre as a reference.

The designs would have been submitted no later than 2002, but more likely in the late 1990s. (someone at a company I left in 2002 had a subscription, and I used to flick through them over lunch) - I know there is an online archive, but I don't know how good the search tools are, or how well-indexed it is.

Fingers crossed, thanks for reading.

This seems relevant and is in that range of dates. It immediately popped up in a google search for
"electronic design" solid state anemometer

https://www.electronicdesign.com/technologies/test-measurement/article/21765002/seriesconnected-transistors-use-differential-heating-to-sense-airflow

I loved to read his column each month!
Paul

Hi,
Great site.
https://archive.org/

Searched Bob Pease on it and got his lab notes;
https://archive.org/details/Bob_Pease_Lab_Notes

Tom.. :smiley: :+1: :coffee: :australia:

Just got back to this one, and realised that the schematics in the article appear to be 1x1 pixel GIFs :frowning:

I searched for the title of that article, and found it had been published elsewhere, e.g. https://pe2bz.philpem.me.uk/Detect-Sense/-%20Air-Gas/T-101-DiffHeat-senceAirFlow/DisplayDocument.pdf

Here is Figure 1 from the above; see references below to earlier articles.

The circuit in Figure 1 combines
ideas from two earlier IFDs (“Low-
Power Thermal Airspeed Sensor,”
ELECTRONIC DESIGN, May 25, 1998, p. 116;
and “Low-Power Solid-State Airflow Detector,”
ELECTRONIC DESIGN, Jan. 22, 2001, p.
118).

1 Like

Hi,
That looks worth building and experimenting with. :smiley:

Tom... :smiley: :+1: :coffee: :australia:

This is the one I was looking for - the key was the author's name.

Unfortunately, no schematic...yet.

That sounds like a pretty interesting idea.

Maybe write to the author? I tried to find him, without obvious success.

I tried a few years back, via his university but got no reply, but I just noticed on a comment on another topic that he's still active (literally today!) so I'll try again.