Enthusiastic about LightBlue Bean+/ Fun blog

This isn't a typical "how do I....?" I just wanted to bring something to your attention which I thought you might find interesting...

LightBlue Bean+ is an Arduino-compatible board that is programmed wirelessly using Bluetooth Low Energy

I signed up to $upport development of a little Bluetooth Arduino. I've more than had my money back, just in the chance to "watch from the sidelines". The posts by the developers to their supporters have been fascinating. I'll give you a link in a moment.

The latest is full of Good Stuff, but, "dessert" was just a bit of fun, thrown in... with 21 lines of code, the device (they've had production samples, nearly "out the door") can be used to "inject" either...

:thumbsup:

or

:thumbsdown:

... into the text of a message on a nearby PC or tablet. (Forgive my failure to be "with it"... I infer that there's a social medium called "Slack", and that the messages shown are their version of forum.Arduino Karma, or a Facebook "like"/ "dislike"?)... ANYWAY....

The device is a little battery-operated, Bluetooth capable "Arduino". It has an accelleromter as standard. Once you connect a button, and the 21 lines of code (given in first link below), you hold it in your hand, and press the button while moving your hand up or down. And that "types" (via HID mode) the text given (and CR/LF) into what you were saying in your Slack post. (As I said... just a bit of fun!)

https://www.hackster.io/Punch-Through/slack-thumberator-721421

The project's Kickstarter home, where you can read the illuminating blog, is at....

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1966384672/a-bluetooth-arduino-for-the-mobile-age-lightblue-b

... and initial release of the product to backers may start as soon as June.

=== From wireless keyfobs to lock/ unlock our cars, to FitBits, to Bluetooth speakers to give us music from our tablets, we are immersed in a sea of little devices. (To say nothing of the big devices!) The "peek behind the scenes" afforded by the Bean+ development blog was fascinating to me, as made me even more aware of all the work done for us by the engineers who get these things working.