ESP8266 Peer to peer? How?

I'd like to use the ESP8266 with a Nano. The Nano will interface to another device. This will all be located in the sticks - no routers or network. A person will walk up with an Android and talk (via the ESP8266) to the Arduino. The amount of traffic will be relatively small (10s of bytes each way), just control signals, nothing streaming.

Does anyone know how to setup the 8266 for Peer-to-peer? The user (on Droid) will have to scan for wifi signals and select the desired unit. So the Arduino doesn't have to "find" anything. Just broadcast its availability periodically, until connected. UDP is also an option as the Droid app will know if a packet is dropped or won't care.

TIA

Barry

Barry/
Try to search "ESP8266 mesh" , "ESP8266 ad-hoc" or "ESP8266 Soft AP". Theres also these threads MESH network (any sort of?) - Everything ESP8266 WiFi Direct - Everything ESP8266.

I'm looking also for the solution of this. Please post it when you have done researching about this

Same thing I am also looking for, but not finding enough info. ALAS.

What's the advantage of WiFi for a remote mesh network over, say, Zigbee or nRF24L01+, especially given how little bandwidth is needed, other than that one of the nodes will occasionally have to be able to talk to a WiFi device such as an Android phone? ESP8266 is cheap but nRF24L01+ is even cheaper, plus less supporting HW like level shifters and 3.3 regulators and such. Sorry if this is a newbie question.

habanero:
What's the advantage of WiFi for a remote mesh network over, say, Zigbee or nRF24L01+, especially given how little bandwidth is needed, other than that one of the nodes will occasionally have to be able to talk to a WiFi device such as an Android phone? ESP8266 is cheap but nRF24L01+ is even cheaper, plus less supporting HW like level shifters and 3.3 regulators and such. Sorry if this is a newbie question.

IMHO Zigbee is on its way out; it will be overtaken by WiFi. Nobody is going to start adding a Zigbee mesh to their home when WiFi is already (typically) available.

The ESP8266 is a much more powerful chip than the nRF24L01; it's a 32bit microcontroller (plus lots of memory) and radio in one. Now that decent SDKs are available for the ESP8266 you don't even need to pair an Arduino with it. I'll agree that there aren't a lot of good breakout boards for the ESP8266, but there are projects like NodeMCU which are decent.

Chagrin:
IMHO Zigbee is on its way out; it will be overtaken by WiFi. Nobody is going to start adding a Zigbee mesh to their home when WiFi is already (typically) available.

The ESP8266 is a much more powerful chip than the nRF24L01; it's a 32bit microcontroller (plus lots of memory) and radio in one. Now that decent SDKs are available for the ESP8266 you don't even need to pair an Arduino with it. I'll agree that there aren't a lot of good breakout boards for the ESP8266, but there are projects like NodeMCU which are decent.

I can certainly see the advantage and appeal of the ESP8266 as a standalone board given that it's basically a microcontroller with WiFi built-in. I was actually wondering about its advantage in a peer to peer or mesh network of Arduinos. Seems a bit overkill for that, except the node that will be tasked with connecting to the internet.

As for breakout boards, when I get mine I intend to build my own. Shouldn't be that hard. The critical part seems to be making sure that you bring the Vcc down to 3.3V and do proper level conversion. I'm guessing that resistors won't cut it given the speeds WiFi operates at, so I ordered a cheap board off eBay that's based on MOSFETS a la Spark or Adafruit's boards.

There are already chips out that improve on the ESP8266, and I'm sure with every year that passes there will be something new that makes the last year's look like junk. WiFi will be around for quite a while though, so as long as you can communicate with that network you should be pretty future-proof.

habanero:
I'm guessing that resistors won't cut it given the speeds WiFi operates at, so I ordered a cheap board off eBay that's based on MOSFETS a la Spark or Adafruit's boards.

Resistor dividers for the serial lines (or line) should be fine under most circumstances. Your IOs aren't running at WiFi speeds y'know.

Since I'm still fairly new to Arduino and really electronics in general I ordered a couple of these RF boards along with an ESP8266 and a HC-05 Bluetooth module off eBay, where as everyone knows they're pretty cheap. I'll play around with each to see their pros and cons for my needs.

It's just that given how cheap the nRF24L01+ is, less than a buck each if bought 2 or more at a time (and you obviously need at least 2 to use them), even if they're less capable than the ESP8266, they might make more sense (no pun intended) if you've got a bunch of standalone sensor stations that need to talk to each other or to a base station nearby.

Of course, each will still need to be connected to some sort of microcontroller to work, as they're not standalone devices like the ESP8266, plus you need some sort of breakout board or wiring harness to connect the two, so that brings costs back up to parity with an ESP8266. But the ESP8266 is supposed to use quite a bit of current, so there might still be advantage to the nRF24L01+ from what I've read.

Obviously there's a reason that they're popular. But the same can be said of the ESP8266.