External Power Source?

Hi, I am very new to electronics. This will sound really stupid, but I was wondering if there is some kind IC or component that allows the trigger of the Arduino's two volts or whatever, to power something from any other kind of power source, without doing something with the Arduino. Kind of like an audio amplifier. I want something that's really easy to hook up. Arduino in, much bigger battery in, and high voltage from the same Arduino pulses out.

The major tools for doing this are the transistor, MOSFET, relay or solid state relay. Each has it’s place and it all depends on what you are planning to control.

The major tools for doing this are the transistor, MOSFET, relay or solid state relay. Each has it's place and it all depends on what you are planning to control.

Cool! At the moment, I'm just using a little motor(Which I assume is just the transistor EDIT: I worded that badly. I mean that it would just use the transistor in addition to the motor, not that it is one. ), but I have wanted to know this for other things. How would you use all of them, and what would you use them each for?

A motor is not a transistor, and can not be used in sted of one. you would typically use a transistor to drive a motor. If you connect a motor (except for the very smallest ones) directly to Arduino you can damage or destroy the board.

I can recomend the book "Physical computing" by Tom Igoe. It's a goldmine of very practical information on hooking just about anything up to a microprocessor. He doesen't use Arduino, but all the schematics can easily be used with Arduino.

To drive inductive loads ( smaller motors, relays, solenoids) you would typically use a transistor like TIP120 or similar. If more control over a motor is needed, like both speed and direction control you would use an H bridge IC.

To control things connect to mains power a relay is frequently used, but don't try this if you are not experienced it can potentially kill you!

This might be interesting:

Driving DC motor with H bridge: http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/Labs/DCMotorControl

Driving a DC motor (speed only) with TIP120 transistor http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/Tutorials/HighCurrentLoads

Using a relay (DON'T TRY THIS IF YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT YOU ARE DOING): http://www.arduino.cc/playground/uploads/Learning/relays.pdf

A motor is not a transistor, and can not be used in sted of one. you would typically use a transistor to drive a motor. If you connect a motor (except for the very smallest ones) directly to Arduino you can damage or destroy the board.

I can recomend the book "Physical computing" by Tom Igoe. It's a goldmine of very practical information on hooking just about anything up to a microprocessor. He doesen't use Arduino, but all the schematics can easily be used with Arduino.

To drive inductive loads ( smaller motors, relays, solenoids) you would typically use a transistor like TIP120 or similar. If more control over a motor is needed, like both speed and direction control you would use an H bridge IC.

To control things connect to mains power a relay is frequently used, but don't try this if you are not experienced it can potentially kill you!

This might be interesting:

Driving DC motor with H bridge: http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/Labs/DCMotorControl

Driving a DC motor (speed only) with TIP120 transistor http://itp.nyu.edu/physcomp/Tutorials/HighCurrentLoads

Using a relay (DON'T TRY THIS IF YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT YOU ARE DOING): http://www.arduino.cc/playground/uploads/Learning/relays.pdf

Thanks. I know the motor is not a transistor. ;) I get the idea of all of this, but not the details. Thanks for that tutorial on the transistor, that helped me. I got a 9v motor to work with that. Yeah, I won't try that realay one. I don't even think you need to say 'don't try this if you don't know what you're doing', I just showed you all that I can't use a transistor. I'm a major n00b. :)

I bookmarked all of the tutorials, I think I may want to drive a gigantic motor some time, so once I get a bit better, I can use the relay. The H-Bridge sounds useful too, but this is mostly just an opportunity to learn about very simple electronics, and I don't think I will use that any time soon. Thanks so much for the response.