Eyeball Setup

I'm currently working on my first Arduino project: a journal with a moving eye powered by the arduino uno. I'm still working on the sketch for the arduino, but right now, I'm reflecting on my initial plan of execution and whether I should change it or not. My current plan would involve 3 servo motors controlling 1 eye (1 servo for L/R movement, 1 for U/D movement, and 1 for the eyelid blink). The servos, eye, and arduino would all be placed on the top of a binder, which would then be placed under the cover of a larger binder (like a book within a book). The servos, eye and eyelid would be positioned on the lower cover in manner that would allow the servos to move the eye around so it looks like it's actually looking around. My only problem with this is that I may not have enough space to position everything the way I want it, and I'm starting to wonder if I might be able to achieve the same effects- but by using less servos? Maybe 2 instead of 3?
So my big question is if you think having the eye controlled by 1 servo on a pivot/ball joint, instead of 2 servos on hinge-like joints would be a better choice? If so, does anyone have any ideas/suggestion for how to construct the joint; because it would have to fit under the eye, and still be flat enough that it won't make me have the raise the cover any higher than I already intend to. If what I'm describing doesn't make sense, or you need a visual to help you follow what I'm saying, please let me know and I'll try to provide a blueprint sketch of what I'm trying to make. Like I said, this is my first arduino project, I just want some advice to help me ensure that my vision is attainable (I have a habit of being overly ambitious ^_^), so please, if what I'm saying sounds crazy, don't hesitate to tell me so!

This might be of interest to you:

Does it have to actually control the eye and track something or can it just roll around randomly? Just have a simple motor drive an offset gear behind the eye and use only 1 servo for the blink.

MorganS:
Does it have to actually control the eye and track something or can it just roll around randomly? Just have a simple motor drive an offset gear behind the eye and use only 1 servo for the blink.

It doesn't have to track anything (though that would be cool. Perhaps a project for another day?) I really just want the eye to look around. If I could set up a sketch that makes the servos move the eye randomly, that would be great! There's going to be 1 servo for the blink, and if I can get 1 other to control the eye movement that would be perfect. This is basically the look I'm shooting for: https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/b7/e5/e0/b7e5e0534ddaeeeb19551cc7b3a78a07.jpg
And this is what I want the blink to look like this: Crocodile & Eye Blinking And Slow Motion - YouTube
Do you think something like this could be possible with only 2 (right now, I'm looking at 3) servos?

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/b7/e5/e0/b7e5e0534ddaeeeb19551cc7b3a78a07.jpg:

Yeah, that's the way the final product will look, but I've gotta figure out how/where to place the servos and eye mechanism so it'll fit neatly under the cover. Do you think 3 servos would be too many?

It's not lifting any weight so a small servo is all that's required. Micro servos get pretty small. I'm sure it's possible to fit inside the same size as a human eyeball without spending more than ten bucks on each servo.

The eyes have it Meet Mulder on Vimeo
Full construction details in the free download.

Ok, so now I seem to have reached a fabrication conundrum. Unlike most "animatronic eye" projects, my eye will be lying flat, looking up from the cover of a book. As a result, the positioning is becoming a bit tricky as far as the eye and how the servos are going to be able to move it. A friend who's helping me with the project suggested putting a ball-joint on the eye so that it will be able to look around/swivel (this idea could also eliminate the need for 2 servos controlling the eye), but we still don't know how to set everything in place. Suggestions?

In case of the Youtube example, paint the iris on top of that ball instead of on the front, and it's a pretty flat pack looking up. That's the easy bit. The harder part may be to scale it down sufficiently to fit inside your book cover, and to eliminate the noise.
For the blinking, maybe a solenoid or similar actuator would work. May be smaller but disadvantage is that your eye can only be fully open and fully closed, not half open or slowly opening.

wvmarle:
In case of the Youtube example, paint the iris on top of that ball instead of on the front, and it's a pretty flat pack looking up. That's the easy bit. The harder part may be to scale it down sufficiently to fit inside your book cover, and to eliminate the noise.
For the blinking, maybe a solenoid or similar actuator would work. May be smaller but disadvantage is that your eye can only be fully open and fully closed, not half open or slowly opening.

I'll be using 2 large binders to make my book, so the eye is going to be kind of big. The plan is to use the smaller binder (about 1.5" thick) as the actual book, with its cover serving as the base for the eye and servos. This will all be placed inside of a larger binder (about 3" think, with all of the rings removed) and the the cover of the bigger/outside binder will be the actual cover of the book, so there'll be a hole cut in it for the eye to fit through. I hope my description makes sense. If not, please tell me and I will gladly clear it up or provide pictures.
And I'm completely fine with the blink only being open or closed. I want it to look like a dragon's eye, so the blinks would be pretty quick and cover the whole eye anyway. I'm just trying to figure out how to rig the eye so that it fits and is able to function in the space between the 2 binder covers.

A Google search on "small servo motor" turned up this Sparkfun link as first URL. It fits comfortably in the dimensions you describe, and you can definitely find them a lot smaller. You don't need much force anyway.
Also I'd mount the servos differently than they do in that video: instead of those bands, I'd take a single rigid shaft (steel spring wire or so) that pushes and pulls the eye. Two such shafts can rotate the eye in any direction (you'll only need about 120° of rotation anyway, not full circle). Same for the solenoid/servo operating the eye lid.

wvmarle:
A Google search on "small servo motor" turned up this Sparkfun link as first URL. It fits comfortably in the dimensions you describe, and you can definitely find them a lot smaller. You don't need much force anyway.
Also I'd mount the servos differently than they do in that video: instead of those bands, I'd take a single rigid shaft (steel spring wire or so) that pushes and pulls the eye. Two such shafts can rotate the eye in any direction (you'll only need about 120° of rotation anyway, not full circle). Same for the solenoid/servo operating the eye lid.

Ok, that sounds like a plan. I'll admit however that I'm not entirely familiar with said shafts. Could you maybe provide a picture so I know what to look for/buy? Thanks!

Buy some steel wire. Or steal a wire coat hanger from the closet. Bend it into the shape of a staple, but make it the right length you need.

For more ideas, look at how servos are normally used on model aircraft.