Fake Arduino.

Hello,

I have found a website that I believe is selling fake Arduino's. Store - FoxyTronics
How do I report them for selling counter fit products?

Thanks!

The board looks almost identical but the title says 'Arduino Compatible UNO R3' so they could probably wriggle off the hook by including the word compatible.

Yes it does look almost identical… until you buy one and compare the color with your real UNO… :frowning:

There may be a way to hobble them as I just noticed the arduino -infinity+ sign is trademarked.

Is there anyway to contact the makers of Arduino about this? I love open source but not exact copies that are advertised as real…

I found out how to contact them about fake Arduino’s… trademark@arduino.cc

I bet if enough people complained they would do something about that company!

Thats too bad, I have ordered some stuff from them on eBay. Seemed like a good company. They probably don't make these themselves, I bet they just order them from some Chinese manufacturer.

wizdum:
They probably don't make these themselves, I bet they just order them from some Chinese manufacturer.

It is not their fault they are selling a counterfeit board because someone else made the board. How does that logic work?

I know if just you complain they do something about it.

Good. I did.

I'm not saying its not their fault, this is blatant trademark violation. The problem is they are probably only one of many companies selling these. They don't seem to have a lot of stock, so I doubt they are having these custom made for them. These look very similar to the counterfeit ones I picked up from Amazon sellers, both Megas and Unos.

There was a nice Arduino blog post recently on this very topic.

-- Steven

Hi Guys,

My name's Nathan and I'm the guy behind FoxyTronics. My goal in starting FoxyTronics was to provide hobbyists and students like myself with electronics and robotics components more inexpensively than other stores, which so far I think I've done a pretty good job at (if you compare the prices of the things on my website, in general it's a lot cheaper than other stores). You can read more about my small business here, and more about me here.

Arduino is open source, so I didn't consider that there might be any kind issue since I clearly stated it was "Compatible" on my website. I was not aware that the Arduino compatible boards I've been buying from China might be infringing on the Arduino trademark and I will definitely look into that.

I am very supportive of the Arduino developers and of the Arduino platform. I've personally convinced a lot of people to go out and buy "official" Arduino's from places like SparkFun, Adafruit, and RadioShack. If I could afford to stock the "official" Arduino boards, I would -- but the simple fact is, I can't. I've run the numbers, and if I purchase Arduinos in small quantities (I'm a student, so I can't afford to place a $50,000 wholesale order for Arduinos) and sell them for the standard $29.95, I will lose money.

I'm not trying to do anyone harm, quite the opposite in fact. If you peruse my website, you'll see that it's very education-centric. I'm also not out to get rich -- my profit for the Arduino Compatible Uno's that I'm selling is $2.78 (USD), which I guarantee you is far less than what the big hobby companies make. Also, I've sold a whopping three Arduino Compatible Uno's so far, in case anyone was wondering.

Again, I will look into the trademark issue and if it turns out that using the Ardunio logo on the boards was wrong of the manufacturers to do, I'll find a different version that doesn't use the logo. In the meantime, I added a note to the product description making it more clear that this is not an "official" board.

Thanks,

Nate

RoboticsGuy:
Again, I will look into the trademark issue and if it turns out that using the Ardunio logo on the boards was wrong of the manufacturers to do, I'll find a different version that doesn't use the logo.

The closest I've found so far has been the arduino-compatible boards by EKitsZone; about the only possible hangup on them would be the fact that they use the word "Uno" on the board - but they don't use any of the trademarked symbols, their boards are red colored, etc. If they would just drop the "Uno" on the board, it would be perfect.

I like how it says "design in Italy" instead of "Made in Italy". Kind of like how Macbooks come from California.

I wonder if a compromise could be made. Keep buying the counterfeit boards, but remove the trademark before resale. This is often done on airsoft guns that are made in China. The trademark is sanded off or modified (a MP5 becomes a CM5 if made by CYMA, or a GM5 if made by G&G) prior to resale. That is a really nice price for an Arduino clone, it would be a shame to lose that because they wont remove the trademarks.

RoboticsGuy:
Arduino is open source, so I didn't consider that there might be any kind issue since I clearly stated it was "Compatible" on my website.

From the FAQ... ""Arduino" is a trademark of Arduino team and should not be used for unofficial variants."

I am very supportive of the Arduino developers and of the Arduino platform.

Then stop using the trademark. You have control over your website. You could remove the images displaying the trademark.

I'm not trying to do anyone harm, quite the opposite in fact.

Then stop using the trademark. You have control over your website. You could remove the images displaying the trademark.

Again, I will look into the trademark issue and if it turns out that using the Ardunio logo on the boards was wrong of the manufacturers to do...

It is wrong.

In the meantime, I added a note to the product description making it more clear that this is not an "official" board.

But you are still displaying the trademark.

The problem is very simple. Someone comes to your store, sees an authentic looking board that has the distinct trademark, then decides to buy one because they believe it is a genuine board at a great price. You are deceiving your customers. After this moment, you are knowingly deceiving your customers.

Well, all indications are that the Arduino clones I've been selling probably violate the Arduino trademark due to having the Arduino name and logo on the silkscreen. Because of this, I'm going to stop selling the version I have and will most likely sell the Funduino as a replacement (still waiting to hear back from the Arduino trademark department on that, though).

Long story short, I want to get rid of the five Arduino clones I have in stock and so I'm giving them away for free. If anyone wants one, use the coupon code below (first come first serve, one per person):

SORRYARDUINO:-(

Shipping in the U.S. is $3.64.

-Nate

EDIT: Apparently PayPal (my merchant processor) throws a fit if an item total of $0.00 is passed to it. So until I figure out how to fix this issue, if you want one of the boards you'll have to add something else to your cart before checking out, which should fix the problem.

How about finding out what Arduino wants for you to be a supporter? It may work out.

RoboticsGuy:
(still waiting to hear back from the Arduino trademark department on that, though)

Don't hold your breath. It may take a several weeks. And, given your extremely positive and generous response, you may never hear from them.

I would like to applaud the actions of RoboticsGuy in being upfront and proactive in trying to rectify the situation he is in in regard to these FakeDuinos. Until I read this post

the other day I was obvious to the full extent of this problem. After reading the post and checking my own three Uno’s I found that they are all fake and all bear the Arduino trademark. The makers of official Arduino boards were generous enough to allow the design files for the boards to be made freely available with a few stipulations regarding trademarks,board names etc and many companies (read predominantly, but not exclusively Chinese) have blatantly ignored this generosity in order to screw every last dollar out of the open source community. Like the old adage says “give them an inch and they will take a mile”

Screw every last dollar? I guess they do that by cutting the price.

Or maybe they are taking advantage of something they may or may not be aware of much in the same way that so many consumers are.