figuring out where to plug in the antenna for 433 mhz transmitter receiver

Hello. I am trying to figure out the exact location of my 433 mhz transmitter receiver's. I don't know a part number all I know is that they are made by WayinTop. I uploaded a picture of the receiver on the left transmitter on the right. They came with some copper coils that are supposed to be antennas. I think I know where it goes on the receiver on the left I labelled the hole number 4. I labelled numbers on the picture in paint beside spots where are potential solder points for the antennas. I was wondering if anyone knew the exact locations where the antenna's are supposed to go for both. Thanks for any help by.

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A quick search for WayinTop hit on water irrigation systems, so maybe not quite what you're looking for. :D

However, a Google search for FS1000A delivered the goods. This is one of the first links I found that looks useful. There are plenty of others under the same search.

The receiver should be plugged into the trashcan.

Those receivers are utter, unmitigated garbage: The range is lousy in the best of circumstances. I got like 100 feet tops IIRC? Something like that, under the same conditions where the RXB12 (which can be had for around $1-$1.50) got.... 1200? 1400? Something like that. If you want to run on 3.3v, forget about it (the RXB12 works fine even at 2.5) Oh, and you know how I said it didn't work at long range? They also aren't good at very short range - they seem to get locked into a state where they stop receiving anything (I saw this same behavior several times: Receiver stopped working. Swapped to another receiver, that one worked. Swapped back to the first, broken again. "Huh, I guess I broke it somehow?" But the next day the "broken" one worked again (to the extent that those receivers ever work). My current - unproven - theory is that the AGC gets "stuck" when pushed to the extremes of sensitivity - it uses an opamp in the AGC circuit... but if you pushed that so far that the feedback was outside the common mode input range, it would cease to act as feedback, and would be stuck.... until you unplugged it and let it stay off for a while while the capacitors discharged. As I said, that's unproven, and as much of a rationalization as anything else - I lost interest in that issue the moment I realized that for an extra 50 cents, I could get a receiver with wider operating voltage range, >10x the range, and worked fine in the same room too.

If you've ever wondered why those remote control door bells people get so they can have a doorbell without running wires are so bloody unreliable. If you crack any of them open, you'll recognize the same topology on the receiver. EVEN THE ONES THAT COST FIFTY BUCKS! If I ever had spare time (I can't remember the last time that was), I'd take down the third doorbell our landlord has installed (it's the best so far ~50% of the time when someone rings the doorbell, it rings the doorbell), find the trace carrying data from the RF section to the decoder IC (it's a standard one, that PT-whatever pair), cut it, and wire in an RXB12 instead.... This is also the same reason that wireless themometers are so unreliable.

Those coiled spring antennas - I guess some people find the performance with them to be acceptable, but I never did. Quarter wavelength antenna (17.3 cm) made from solid (not stranded) network or phone wire will absolutely bury those coiled springy things. I was thoroughly amazed by how hard it was to beat the performance of one wire of a piece of scrap telco quad, or some of this similar wire that I got as a 2 conductor twisted pair by the side of the road downwind of a construction site. even when I loosly coiled it to firt inside an enclosure, I had no complaints about it's performance, which is more than can be said for the other antenna solutions I tried.

Also, WayinTop is just a vendor name, they're sold by thousands of vendors. There are a couple of near clone designs made by manufacturers, but far more sellers than manufacturers. But they all look similar enough that they're easy to identify the crap ones - green PCB, that weird plastic cheap looking thing in the middle (I think a variable inductor used to tune it), and abysmal performance. What I don't understand is why - when far better ones can be competitively sold for just a tiny bit more, the better ones are sold be comparatively few sellers. Still trivial to find the RXB12 on ebay, amazon, and aliexpress.

The ones made with SYN470 or SYN480 IC, like the RXB12, are much better. Apparently the SYN470 is also sold unmarked (either that, or they're counterfeits/clones that didn't bother to copy the logo - they work fine though) - but with or without synoxo logo, they have the 6.7458 MHz crystal. That's the reference frequency (433mhz is 64x that). Interestingly enough the SYN115 transmitter IC from the same company is less impressive.

The cheap green transmitters are usually fine - haven't used that specific design, but all the ones I did use performed nearly as well as the best-in-class among the cheapies (The STX882 took the cake among transmitters, but only by like 10%).

Also, apparently many of those transmitters (who knows how you're supposed to tell) are meant to run from 4.5~12v; that's why many of the doorbells I mentioned use that wacky 12v battery (god forbid they fix the actually problem, that the receiver sucks...)

Thanks for the help I tested out a few different parts they seem to be consistently working well for now my purpose does not require much in ways of performance as long as they work through walls and for 35 feet will do for distance im making a home security system thanks for the help.

DrAzzy: They also aren't good at very short range - they seem to get locked into a state where they stop receiving anything (I saw this same behavior several times: Receiver stopped working. Swapped to another receiver, that one worked. Swapped back to the first, broken again. "Huh, I guess I broke it somehow?" But the next day the "broken" one worked again (to the extent that those receivers ever work). My current - unproven - theory is that the AGC gets "stuck" when pushed to the extremes of sensitivity - it uses an opamp in the AGC circuit... but if you pushed that so far that the feedback was outside the common mode input range, it would cease to act as feedback, and would be stuck...

I don't think they are sophisticated enough to contain an opamp, just an RF strip with AGC. The head end will easily overload at short range I reckon. These devices are crude as you alluded to in no uncertain terms! I think of them as something rather like an early valve radio done with transistors and minimal tuned circuits outside the SAW filter. Sensitivity and selectivity are very poor. Reasonably performing RF transceiver modules are much more expensive and far more versatile.