Finding direction of high frequency sound with arduino

Hello, I am looking for a small unidirectional mic (preferably breakout) that would be spun 360 degrees and be able to detect the direction of only a high frequency (~20kHZ +) in a loud room. Thanks a bunch for any responses.

That is do-able but it is a do it yourself project unless you want to spend many hundreds of dollars on commercial microphones.

Is there any smaller alternative? I am tracking from about a foot away.

Spaceman_:
Is there any smaller alternative? I am tracking from about a foot away.

Yes, you can use a cardioid electret capsule such as the Panasonic WM-55A103.
http://www.ebay.ca/itm/5pc-new-WM-55A103-Electret-Condenser-MIC-Capsule-Microphone-Cartridge/331964517120
But it has less directionality. You can not resolve the direction to only a few degrees. More like +/-90 degrees. If your sound source varies much, it will be very difficult. The most directional part of a cardioid pattern is the rejection at the back.

Sorry I am kinda new, would I be able to configure that to only detect a certain frequency (20 kHZ+), and can I trigger a response from the arduino when it is facing the desired direction?

Maybe use 3 or 4 of those microphones, in fixed directions 120° or 90° apart. Measure the sound intensity on each channel and interpolate the direction.

Detecting sounds of a particular frequency means building a "band pass filter" for each channel. That's beyond my knowledge at the moment.

Spaceman_:
Sorry I am kinda new, would I be able to configure that to only detect a certain frequency (20 kHZ+), and can I trigger a response from the arduino when it is facing the desired direction?

Then your chances of getting this working are very slim unless you are ready to invest a lot (and I mean a lot!) of time into it.
The feature you are asking about is a bandpass filter.

I see, I might just scrap it then. Just to be clear there is no way I can get it to trigger a response (motors) when it hits a certain HZ?

only a high frequency (~20kHZ +) in a loud room.

It's not too difficult to detect a particular frequency in isolation. But interference from other sounds make it very difficult. You have to filter them out.

I see. Thanks a lot for all your responses

Spaceman_:
I see, I might just scrap it then. Just to be clear there is no way I can get it to trigger a response (motors) when it hits a certain HZ?

There are multiple ways. Any of them will take a lot of time and have a learning curve if you are a beginner.