First Post - Help, my UNO no longer works!

Hello,
I have gotten a lot of useful information from the ARDUINO examples and troubleshooting but I am stuck.

My board was working just fine with the “blink” and “Bare minimum” examples, but suddenly I get a “avrdude: stk500_recv(): programmer is not responding” error no matter what I do.

Here is the vital info per the Sticky:

Operating system: MAC OSX Snow Leapard (10.7.2)
Board: OSEPP Uno (running as Duemilanove w/AT328 per a help online)
has AT328 chip
I WAS able to load to the board successfully many times.
Here is the verbose output now that it isn’t working:
avrdude: Version 5.11, compiled on Sep 2 2011 at 18:52:52
Copyright (c) 2000-2005 Brian Dean, http://www.bdmicro.com/
Copyright (c) 2007-2009 Joerg Wunsch

System wide configuration file is “/Users/user1/Online Business/Arduino.app/Contents/Resources/Java/hardware/tools/avr/etc/avrdude.conf”
User configuration file is “/Users/user1/.avrduderc”
User configuration file does not exist or is not a regular file, skipping

Using Port : /dev/tty.usbserial-A900H0R3
Using Programmer : arduino
Overriding Baud Rate : 57600
avrdude: Send: 0 [30] [20]
avrdude: Send: 0 [30] [20]
avrdude: Send: 0 [30] [20]
avrdude: ser_recv(): programmer is not responding
avrdude: stk500_recv(): programmer is not responding

avrdude done. Thank you.
The “Tools → Serial Port” is /dev/tty.usbserial-A900HOR3
The “L” light just keeps blinking quickly and the power light is on. I am using a USB cable to power it up

Thank you so much for your help,
memotick

I had the same problem with an UNO, but slightly different. I still haven't figured it out, but it may be useful to post "verbose" when trying to load a sketch. If you have the arduino 1.0 IDE, then go to file, preferences, and check the "upload" box under "Show verbose output during:". I found that it told me that mine was sending information to my uno, but not receiving information back.

If you have an older software version, I think you can hold down the shift key while hitting the upload button to get verbose output.

wbegg: I had the same problem with an UNO, but slightly different. I still haven't figured it out, but it may be useful to post "verbose" when trying to load a sketch. If you have the arduino 1.0 IDE, then go to file, preferences, and check the "upload" box under "Show verbose output during:". I found that it told me that mine was sending information to my uno, but not receiving information back.

If you have an older software version, I think you can hold down the shift key while hitting the upload button to get verbose output.

Thanks wbegg, I thought I did verbose based on the instructions to hold the shift key down. But using your instructions I see that was not the case:

avrdude: Version 5.11, compiled on Sep 2 2011 at 18:52:52 Copyright (c) 2000-2005 Brian Dean, http://www.bdmicro.com/ Copyright (c) 2007-2009 Joerg Wunsch

System wide configuration file is "/Users/user1/Online Business/Arduino.app/Contents/Resources/Java/hardware/tools/avr/etc/avrdude.conf" User configuration file is "/Users/user1/.avrduderc" User configuration file does not exist or is not a regular file, skipping

Using Port : /dev/tty.usbserial-A900H0R3 Using Programmer : arduino Overriding Baud Rate : 57600 avrdude: Send: 0 [30] [20] avrdude: Send: 0 [30] [20] avrdude: Send: 0 [30] [20] avrdude: ser_recv(): programmer is not responding avrdude: stk500_recv(): programmer is not responding

avrdude done. Thank you.

Just realized that the L light blinking on the UNO may be the "blink" program burnt into memory and I can't seem to override it... not sure though

Also, the loopback test passed.

The "blink" isn't burnt in, unless that happened to be the last thing you uploaded. What were you doing before this problem occurred? Describe in some detail, like wiring, etc.

[quote author=Nick Gammon link=topic=88442.msg664790#msg664790 date=1327382930] The "blink" isn't burnt in, unless that happened to be the last thing you uploaded. What were you doing before this problem occurred? Describe in some detail, like wiring, etc. [/quote]

Nick, Thank you for the reply. The last thing I did before the board started acted funny was having LEDs tied through 10k resistors to ground attached to digital outs 0-5. I know TX and RX are tied to the first two, so I thought maybe that was the issue. However, I removed all of the wiring, reset the board, reinstalled Arduino and am stuck.

Please let me know what other info might be helpful in debugging this as I don't know what else to do.

Thanks again, memotick

Is it likely my boot loader is corrupted?

Ugh... :cold_sweat:

Major frustrations...

Bought another Uno board and everything is working great for about two hours. Then after running compiled sketch successfully for a minute, the program stopped working after getting an Rx from the USB. Now the on-board LED blinks incessantly.

If I reset the board, my previous program runs for about a minute and the same thing happens. I can no longer communicate with the board.

What the heck is going on???

:roll_eyes:

memotick: The last thing I did before the board started acted funny was having LEDs tied through 10k resistors to ground attached to digital outs 0-5. I know TX and RX are tied to the first two, so I thought maybe that was the issue.

Can you show a photo or draw your wiring? 10K resistors sound pretty high for LEDs. Did they light up brightly?

[quote author=Nick Gammon link=topic=88442.msg665560#msg665560 date=1327437179]

memotick: The last thing I did before the board started acted funny was having LEDs tied through 10k resistors to ground attached to digital outs 0-5. I know TX and RX are tied to the first two, so I thought maybe that was the issue.

Can you show a photo or draw your wiring? 10K resistors sound pretty high for LEDs. Did they light up brightly? [/quote]

Nick,

Here is a picture of the circuit. Each resistor is either 2 or 5k ohms from the digital pin to the 7-segment LED. The LED's ground return is tied to the Uno's ground (the long green wire). Although it may look like it in the picture, none of the resistor leads are shorting:

and here is a link to the OSEPP schematic: http://osepp.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/OSEPP_Uno_Arduino_Compatible-Rev1.1-Schematic.pdf

Hope that helps

It looks OK to me. I would be trying getting a USBtinyISP for around $22, plugging it into the ICSP header, and seeing if you get a response from the board. It sounds odd to have two fail.

I re-read the troubleshooting guide and it inspired me to look at the ports if there is something doing an automatic sync.

I see that even though bluetooth is turned off on the machine, I see /dev/tty.Bluetooth-PDA-Sync listed under Arduino's Tools -> Serial Port drop down menu

Is there something there that is a clue?

This is what I see on my Mac when the Uno is plugged in:

When it isn't, the top two lines are not there.

[quote author=Nick Gammon link=topic=88442.msg665997#msg665997 date=1327470141] This is what I see on my Mac when the Uno is plugged in:

When it isn't, the top two lines are not there. [/quote]

Yeah, that is the same as what I get.

I tried powering the board up with a 7.5V dc and disconnecting the USB... it does the same behavior. Runs my script for a minute, the "L" led lights up constantly for a few seconds and then blinks incessantly.

This is so weird

Have you tried with all the wiring removed, so just the bare bones board and connection to the USB port? This would rule out any issues with the external wiring. You could try to load the helloworld sketch to see if it is working (monitor the terminal window, making sure you have the baud rate set correctly).

I am not sure, but from the photo, are two of those resisitor legs touching? Not sure it is a good idea to sink one pin from another without any resistance in between (on second thoughts, maybe no problem if they are all programmed to be outputs). Probably would be better to use insulated jumpers to your breadboard from the Uno, then use the breadboard to manage the resistors.

[quote author=Paul J link=topic=88442.msg666711#msg666711 date=1327516683] Have you tried with all the wiring removed, so just the bare bones board and connection to the USB port? This would rule out any issues with the external wiring. You could try to load the helloworld sketch to see if it is working (monitor the terminal window, making sure you have the baud rate set correctly).

I am not sure, but from the photo, are two of those resisitor legs touching? Not sure it is a good idea to sink one pin from another without any resistance in between (on second thoughts, maybe no problem if they are all programmed to be outputs). Probably would be better to use insulated jumpers to your breadboard from the Uno, then use the breadboard to manage the resistors. [/quote]

Yes I have tried it with the wiring removed and connected to USB port and it still behaves strange.

The resistors actually aren't shorting, but you have a good point.

I have found something interesting though. If I hold reset long enough before compilation, I can load another sketch. Otherwise I couldn't do this.

Ok, I am making progress. It appears to be program related. I isolated the issue to the code below. Is it possible for a program to cause the “L” led to light up inadvertently and the program hangs?

The suspect section is highlighted in red. Does anything look wrong?

const int LedCount = 6; // the number of Leds to control

int LedPins = { 2,3,4,5,6,7 }; // an array of pin numbers to which Leds are attached
// note that indexing this array starts from 0!!!

// this sets up the Led pins as outputs
void setup() {
// Serial.begin(9600);
// loop over the pin array and set them all to output:
for (int LedON = 0; LedON < LedCount; LedON++) {
pinMode(LedPins[LedON], OUTPUT);
}
}

void loop() {
// left hand rotation
for (int LedON2 = LedCount; LedON2 >= 0; LedON2–) {
// if the array element’s index is less than LedLevel,
// turn the pin for this element on:
digitalWrite(LedPins[LedON2], HIGH);
delay(40);
digitalWrite(LedPins[LedON2], LOW);

}

}

Absolutely it is wrong. First time through the loop you index into position 6 of LedPins, which is outside its range of 0 to 5.

[quote author=Nick Gammon link=topic=88442.msg666786#msg666786 date=1327520860] Absolutely it is wrong. First time through the loop you index into position 6 of LedPins, which is outside its range of 0 to 5. [/quote]

Doh!

Thanks Nick for all the help!

One you (and many others reading this) won't make again in the future. I can relate many issues while learning to programming in different languages which end up with a "Doh" moment :blush:!