For the knowledgable

I'm currently playing with arduinos but the idea I have coffee up with will require a much more advanced platform I'm thinking a actual 32 bit processor with RAM. Basically I need to build a computer system to handle my project so my question is, is there a basic platform for building your own project. I will still need to control pins for control of hardware but I need the ability to run multiple threads on a predecessor to handle the complexity of it all any thoughts or ideas

Raspberry Pi - http://www.raspberrypi.org/ runs a full linux environment, has i/o rails, lots of customization is possible.

http://arduino.cc/en/Main/ArduinoBoardYun?from=Main.ArduinoYUN

but I need the ability to run multiple threads

you haven't told what the project is about..... so it is hard to give sensible advise..

well im incorporating serveral things into one bad ass toy lol im using a tftlcd sd but i want to also use bluetooth, wifi, and some how make a method of reading high quality mp3s with am fm radio and read a bunch of serial data from other things kinda like if you took everything cool and packed it into one box.

so this raspberry pi i have heard of them do they do everything arduino can?

You’d need to sort out the radio tuner yourself, but for the other stuff you mention a Teensy might be a suitable platform.

I remember reading about an Arduino clone recently that included Bluetooth and WiFi, but I don’t remember what it was called.

PeterH: You'd need to sort out the radio tuner yourself, but for the other stuff you mention a Teensy might be a suitable platform.

https://www.sparkfun.com/products/12646

I remember reading about an Arduino clone recently that included Bluetooth and WiFi, but I don't remember what it was called.

I suspect you were thinking of the DigiX, http://digistump.com/wiki/digix which is mostly a Due clone, but it doesn't include bluetooth. Instead it includes:

  • A socket for nRF24L01+ wireless mesh support;
  • 99 pins;
  • PWM on 12 pins;
  • 12 analog input pins;
  • 2 analog output pins;
  • 4 serial connections on 8 pins;
  • 2 I2C busses;
  • SPI;
  • CAN bus;
  • Audio;
  • USB OTG;
  • a microSD card slot;
  • EEPROM;

It was originally a kickstarter project: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/digistump/digix-the-ultimate-arduino-compatible-board-with-w, and it is just winding down the delivery phase. They haven't established the retail prices yet. Perhaps you can still do a pre-order at the lower kickstarter price if you act quickly: https://digistump.com/digix-pre-order.

Well I have looked into the raspberry and it looks pretty promising I like the ideas of a full operating system but the fact that you hato make a buffer board is kinda annoying does any one on here use on of these boards and if so how is thier easy of use in comparison to arduino

They are not as easy to use as an Arduino and Linux keeps freezing the programs for a second every ten or so, but a lot of people don't seem to mind this. All the Linux runners will have the same sort of frigile I/O just get used to it. Being Linux and a much more powerful processor gives you the advantage of there being lots of stuff written already with the disadvantage of it being Linux.

Besides the Rasberry Pi, other Linux in SOC (system on a chip) systems to think of include:

The Beaglebone Black and PCduino don’t have wifi builtin, but you can add a USB wifi dongle. These run Linux variants and you access the GPIO pins through Linux calls. You are not be able to do timing sensitive programming to the GPIO pins on these system (or the Rasberry Pi) like ws2812 lights (i.e. neopixels from adafruit), but you could add an Arduino that communicates with these systems via i2c to do real time communication, and let the Linux stuff handle the more complex wifi/web support. The Rasberry Pi has its own user base, and I see a lot of interest in Beagle Bone Black since it was announced (more techies seem drawn to BBB). After its announcement, I haven’t seen much about the pcDunio.

The Yun and Tre are actually two computers in one. One side runs Linux on either a MIPS (Yun) or Arm (Tre) chip, and the other side has a ATmega32u4 chip that you can do the normal Arduino stuff. There is an internal serial line that connects the two computers. The initial run of Yun sold out almost immediately, but I’ve seen notices that places like adafruit now have them in stock. The Yun does not have bluetooth, but that is easily added. The Tre is not yet available, but the BeagleBone folks helped to design the Linux bits, so it likely will be similar to the current BeagleBone.

The Intel Galileo is a strange beast. Rather than having low power Arm/MIPS chips driving it, Intel put in an x86 chip in it that needs 5 volts and 3 amps of power (so it can’t be powered by USB). Also, all of the GPIO pins are done through an I2C interface, which means you can’t done things like neopixels.

Rather than having low power Arm/MIPS chips driving it, Intel put in an x86 chip in it that needs 5 volts and 3 amps of power

Not quite. You get a 3A power supply, you can just about run it off a USB port without an SD card in it. In normal operation ( running Linux and a CD card) it takes about 800mA.

Grumpy_Mike:

Rather than having low power Arm/MIPS chips driving it, Intel put in an x86 chip in it that needs 5 volts and 3 amps of power

Not quite. You get a 3A power supply, you can just about run it off a USB port without an SD card in it. In normal operation ( running Linux and a CD card) it takes about 800mA.

I thought I read counter-indications in the announcements for it that you must hook up the external power, and not use USB power. It may be they were assuming you would use the SD card.