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LMFAO. So believable.

I showed my 11 year a floppy disk, she said, yeah we have them at school....

I was in shock lol (at the school i send my daughter too!)

ha ha, I wonder how many symbols we currently use actually refer to a real-life object that’s long disappeared.


Rob

Like the icon on a mobile phone of a landline handset Or a voice recorder showing two tape reels.

So let’s see who is first (well, second…) to find the mistake the artist made while creating that cartoon…
:stuck_out_tongue:

every now and then I get strange looks when I say "Hit return"

"What's return?"

me, "You know, carriage return."

"Where's that on the keyboard?"

me, "FFS! It's the big key on the right, near the numeric keypad!!!"

"You mean enter"

MAS3: So let's see who is first (well, second...) to find the mistake the artist made while creating that cartoon... :P

He is showing the label (top) side of the floppy, but the bevelled corner and the window in the metal slider are on the wrong side.

Alternatively, you could say that, based on the corner and the slider, he is showing the bottom of the disk, but drew the label instead of the hub.

Congratulations you've been "rewarded".

Actually what i saw was that the disk is drawn mirrored (and from the label side). Had to go to the next room (which looks like a hoarders nest) to confirm this by digging up an actual floppy disk. But your description leads to the same picture drawn.

ha. I looked at it and though 'this looks off'. but I attributed it to simply not having seen a floppy (yeah, I know, that actually refers to something mystical, that I am too young to actually remember...) in a long time.

happy to see that it actually is off.

"You know, carriage return."

What's a carriage and why would it have to return?

For that matter anyone know what a TAB is?

And CC, why would you "carbon" copy someone?

Yeah all you old timers will know.


Rob

what is tab?

On typewriters there was a row of little metal "tabs", one for each character on a line. Mostly they were in a low position but if you raised one (with a special key IIRC) it would block the "carriage" from moving.

Pressing TAB would allow the carriage to free run to the left until it physically hit one of these raised tabs at which point it stopped and you resumed typing at a given column.


Rob

just to throw another spanner in the works...

isn't tab diet cola?

;-)

cyberteque: just to throw another spanner in the works...

isn't tab diet cola?

;-)

naah, tab is where you go to to place bets... $)

Graynomad:

"You know, carriage return."

What's a carriage and why would it have to return?

the carriage of a typewriter needs to return back to the left plus move roller up to a new line.

Graynomad: For that matter anyone know what a TAB is?

above...

Graynomad: And CC, why would you "carbon" copy someone?

a copy of a letter, now even further changed to "hard" copy for physical, and "soft" copy for 'file on your disk' version. carbon (paper) was the method with which a copy was made, as you wrote the letter.

I disagree. CarbonCopy: The second (and 3rd or 4th if you were desperate) sheet of paper rolled into the typewrite at the same time., ie. as a stack. Between each papersheet was a thin sheet of carbon paper (on a clean sheet of "plastic", so the carbon was only on one side). When the typewrite keys struck hard on the paper (through the ribbon as to leav an impresison), it also would leave an impression on the 2nd sheet from the (first) carbon sheet.

This second piece would be the CarbonCopy. It would not be as crisp as the top "original" sheet as the outline of the typefont/letter was evened out by the "cushion" effect of ribbon, original and carbon sheet. It was even worse on the 2nd CC (3rd sheet) and so on. If the typist used a pure manual, and her (it was always a "she" - equality wasnt invented yet ;) ) strength varied the lower down copies would sometimes have very weak or missing letters.

As her superior onDet kan da godt være en god idee. PÅ den anden side, hvis jeg skal ind i hovedtavlen for at tage ledningerne fra så gider jeg ikke.

When one wrote a letter - or rather the handwritten or dictation, one would say which importent recepients would need an "Original" and the others got a CC - Carbon Copy. This was a fund way of determineing your importance in the office hireachy - the ratio of "originals" to "CC" in your inbox.

WIth the advent of the Xerox copy machine the distinction got blurred. The typist only needed to to type one copy and then xerox the rest, and it was harder to notice if you got the cc. (Except the early Xerox machine used a coated paper and it was VERY obvious this was a CC - but now the CC was as legible as the original so it mattered less)

Oh yes ... did I tell you about the snow, and the coal heating amd the long 26 hour working days .... :) ?

Msquare: Oh yes ... did I tell you about the snow, and the coal heating and the long 26 hour working days .... :) ?

Well, it seems like only the last one has survived.

WIth the advent of the Xerox copy machine the distinction got blurred

I can remember my Dad taking me to the office he worked in to show me the new Xerox machine.
It was the size of two desks, and had its own permanent operator.

Anyone remember wax stencils?

There is this kit if you yearn for those days: https://www.etsy.com/listing/62642931/usb-typewriter-conversion-kit-diy?ref=sr_gallery_22&ga_search_query=typewriter+electronics&ga_order=most_relevant&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_ship_to=US&ga_search_type=all

That's hot !

It has the very rare phlogiston, where did they get that ? For that price, all reading here should order it today.