Found today on the intertez

"If your computer speaks English, it was probably made in China".

How about you, read any good ones lately or have some 'golden oldies" ?

Or even just on your PC, to shut down click on start !

That makes sense, you are starting the shutdown process :slight_smile:


Rob

Graynomad:
That makes sense, you are starting the shutdown process :slight_smile:


Rob

Yes but how many people other than programmers think like that. It is one of the prime examples of why Microsoft got it wrong.

Grumpy_Mike:

Graynomad:
That makes sense, you are starting the shutdown process :slight_smile:


Rob

Yes but how many people other than programmers think like that. It is one of the prime examples of why Microsoft got it wrong.

This is in contrast to the Windows 8 method for shutting down a PC, which makes sense to no one at all. You just hover the mouse over of the right hand side of the screen for a few seconds with no visual queue, then right click (which slides a menu onto the screen), then click "settings", then click shutdown. That doesn't actually shut down the computer though, it just puts it into standby mode. If you want it to actually shut down, you have to hold shift while you click shutdown.

I've been building PCs for over 15 years, and I had to look at a manual to figure out how to turn off my mom's new Windows 8 PC.

The mind boggles about what they are thinking at Microsoft.

KICS ( keep it complicated stupid ) ?

One day they'll get it right...or maybe not.

My personal maxim is MIRC, Make It Really Complicated. Works for me :slight_smile:


Rob

Desktop PC "click start to shut down"
OP clicks start
PC "are you really sure that you want to shut down?"
OP clicks YES
PC "you have shut down all your apps? Your not going to rely on me shutting them all down properly."
OP clicks YES, click click...
PC "you have done your weekly backups? Virus Checker, System Tuner...."
OP clicks Yes, click, click, click, click
PC "ok ok don't get your underwear in knots, I'm only making sure..
OP clicks YES click
PC "you see if I don't do this shutdown properly, you will blame me, and I am only trying to safely and efficiently close you system down, Dave"
OP (Dave???) clicks all over the screen.
PC "I find that if I do not do a satisfactory assignment that you get very upset with me.."
OP ctrl-alt-del
PC "sorry Dave I can't let you do that, you will jepeardise the mission I have been given to look after the welfare of the system and shut it down safely and efficiently."
OP getsd out of seat and moves to back of PC
PC "what are you doing Dave, don't pull the main power plug Dave, it will only cause an unauthorised shutdown, I cannot guarantee the outc..........................................."
OP plugs computer back in after 5mins, turns ON.
PC blue screen, sound from speakers, "daisy daisy give me answer do, I'm half crazy all for the love of you."
OP sighs in relief, "now where did I hide that restore disk, or where did I put the unbunto CD...."

Tom... :slight_smile:

There was a early 60s VW running around sillycon valley in the 80s with license Feature.

I too couldn't shut down my win8 PC without asking how.

I think it's because it's designed for devices that you never actually shut down, like tablets and laptops. I rarely bother shutting my laptop down, I just close the lid and it goes to sleep.

I just like to shut mine down every now and then to clear all its temporary files that I know about, and probably more cache and files I have never heard of.

It works with me when I can get a good sleep every now and then :slight_smile:

wizdum:
This is in contrast to the Windows 8 method for shutting down a PC, which makes sense to no one at all. You just hover the mouse over of the right hand side of the screen for a few seconds with no visual queue, then right click (which slides a menu onto the screen), then click "settings", then click shutdown. That doesn't actually shut down the computer though, it just puts it into standby mode. If you want it to actually shut down, you have to hold shift while you click shutdown.

I've been building PCs for over 15 years, and I had to look at a manual to figure out how to turn off my mom's new Windows 8 PC.

Learned something new today.

You have my sympathy/understanding and forgivness on RTFM for the shutdown sequence. :slight_smile:

It was bad enough that every new version of Windows played musical chairs with the control panel icons. Windows 8 just nailed the coffin for me. I use Linux at work (preference anyway) and am trying out a Hackintosh as my main home PC.

The whole bit about "it's supposed to train you not to use shutdown" sounds very plausible to me, but as a long-term user of Windows, I don't hold much faith in its ability to remain running indefinitely without there being a performance penalty. Windows 7 has made strides (I have a laptop that I always hibernate instead of shutdown) but at my last job, where I had a Windows 7 PC and a Linux PC running together side-by-side, I would reboot Linux for hardware / kernel changes and power outages. I would reboot Windows between once a month and once a season. Not bad, but not quite appliance-like.

Aside from the technical shortcomings, you can't just flip the paradigm on an entire industry and expect everyone to be OK with it. People are creatures of habit, and most of them don't consider it fun and amusing to learn new OSes, any more than a carpenter would like to try out a new concept for The Hammer every four years.

try out a new concept for The Hammer every four years.

Well said !

I thought of a TV sketch where passengers taking their seats on a new Airbus 980, or Boeing Ogasmiliner, or whatever, hear the familiar tune ( for us XP types anyway ) of Windows booting up, and all rush for the escape doors.

SirNickity:
It was bad enough that every new version of Windows played musical chairs with the control panel icons. Windows 8 just nailed the coffin for me. I use Linux at work (preference anyway) and am trying out a Hackintosh as my main home PC.

The whole bit about “it’s supposed to train you not to use shutdown” sounds very plausible to me, but as a long-term user of Windows, I don’t hold much faith in its ability to remain running indefinitely without there being a performance penalty. Windows 7 has made strides (I have a laptop that I always hibernate instead of shutdown) but at my last job, where I had a Windows 7 PC and a Linux PC running together side-by-side, I would reboot Linux for hardware / kernel changes and power outages. I would reboot Windows between once a month and once a season. Not bad, but not quite appliance-like.

Aside from the technical shortcomings, you can’t just flip the paradigm on an entire industry and expect everyone to be OK with it. People are creatures of habit, and most of them don’t consider it fun and amusing to learn new OSes, any more than a carpenter would like to try out a new concept for The Hammer every four years.

Exactly. I have a Linux (CentOS) server colocated in a datacenter. It always amazes my windows server-trained friends when I log into webmin and they see “Uptime: 440 Days”.

Boffin1:

try out a new concept for The Hammer every four years.

Well said !

I thought of a TV sketch where passengers taking their seats on a new Airbus 980, or Boeing Ogasmiliner, or whatever, hear the familiar tune ( for us XP types anyway ) of Windows booting up, and all rush for the escape doors.

LOL!!

and how about the "flight attendants" wearing "G-lazzes" with annoying popups as they do their work;
"i see you are struggling with pouring that coffee, would you like me to assist you ?"

retrolefty:

"If your computer speaks English, it was probably made in China".

How about you, read any good ones lately or have some 'golden oldies" ?

So today I found this jem on how confusing the English language can be apparently. :wink:

"No, they mean the lead that rhymes with read, not the one that rhymes with read."

Oh, and another:

"Part of the problem is that the programming profession hasn't had its professional renaissance like the medical profession had in the twentieth century."

If Bud Abbott and Lou Costello were alive today, their famous sketch, "Who's on First?" may have sounded something like this:

Costello calls a computer store to ask about a computer. Abbot answers the phone.

Abbott: Super Duper Computer Store. Can I help you?

Costello: Yes. I'm setting up an office at home and I'm thinking about buying a computer.

Abbott: Mac?

Costello: No, my name's Lou.

Abbott: Your computer?

Costello: I don't own a computer. I want to buy one.

Abbott: Mac?

Costello: I told you, my name's Lou.

Abbott: OK then, what about Windows?

Costello: Why? Will it get stuffy in there?

Abbott: No. But do you want a computer with Windows?

Costello: I don't know. What will I see when I look at the windows?

Abbott: Wallpaper at first.

Costello: Never mind the windows! I need a computer and some software.

Abbott: Software for Windows?

Abbott and Costello Computer Skit Costello: No! On the computer! I need something I can use to run my business, write proposals and track expenses. What do you have?

Abbott: Office.

Costello: Yeah, for my office. I told you that. Can you recommend anything?

Abbott: I just did.

Costello: You just did what?

Abbott: Recommended something.

Costello: You recommended something?

Abbott: Yes.

Costello: For my office?

Abbott: Yes.

Costello: OK. What did you recommend for my office?

Abbott: Office.

Costello: Yes, for my office!

Abbott: I recommend Office with Windows.

Costello: My office already has windows! OK, let's just say I'm sitting at my computer and I want to write a proposal. What would I need?

Abbott: Word.

Costello: What word?

Abbott: Word in Office.

Costello: The only word in office is office.

Abbott: You need the Word in Office for Windows.

Costello: Which word in office for windows?

Abbott: The Word you get when you click the blue "W."

Costello: I'm going to click your blue "W" if you don't give me some straight answers. What about bookkeeping? Do you have anything I can use to track my money?

Abbott: Sure, Money.

Costello: That's right. What do you have?

Abbott: Money.

Costello: I need money to track my money?

Abbott: Yes, and It comes bundled with your computer.

Costello: What comes bundled with my computer?

Abbott: Money.

Costello: Money comes with my computer?

Abbott: Yes. No extra charge.

Costello: I get a bundle of money with my computer? How much do I get?

Abbott: One copy.

Costello: Isn't it illegal to copy money?

Abbott: We got a license from Microsoft to copy Money.

Costello: They can give you a license to copy money?

Abbott: Why not? They own it!

(A few days later)

Abbott: Super Duper Computer Store. Can I help you?

Costello: How do I turn my computer off?

Abbott: Click "START."

My reaction:
LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOL

Golden Oldies:

I love deadlines. I love the whooshing sound they make as they zoom by!

If you make a computer language that allows programmers to write code in English you will find that programmers can't write English.

Users should not complain about the code they get. They're lucky to get anything at all.

SirNickity:
Aside from the technical shortcomings, you can't just flip the paradigm on an entire industry and expect everyone to be OK with it. People are creatures of habit, and most of them don't consider it fun and amusing to learn new OSes, any more than a carpenter would like to try out a new concept for The Hammer every four years.

This is one of my current pet peeves. At some point here the HCI people evidently decided that anything goes. It's OK to design a new UI every day, depending on how you're feeling. I'm seeing this in operating systems, applications, etc. etc. etc.

As for hammers, remember, "All tools are hammers." :smiley: