Frequency Multiplier

Hi all!

I'm pretty new to Arduino projects, and I could really use some veteran guidance. The project I'm working on requires a square wave output at approx 10kHz. I'm currently using an Arduino Micro PWM output, which I understand has a frequency of about 490Hz. Can anyone recommend a small and lightweight (this is a must; the circuit will be flying on a small UAV) frequency multiplier to get this accomplished? Will putting a frequency multiplier in line cause a voltage drop from the Arduino's native 5V? Any help on this would be very much appreciated. Thanks in advance.

Google "Arduino PWM secrets", you can learn how to change the PWM registers to change the frequency.

Thanks! I'll look into that.

Hi all!

I'm trying to find a way to change the output frequency on my Arduino Micro. Through web searching, I've found plenty of places that list code to accomplish this for many other Arduinos (http://letsmakerobots.com/content/changing-pwm-frequencies-arduino-controllers , for instance), but not for the Micro, which uses the ATmega32U4 processor. I'm really new to microelectronics; my odds of figuring this out on my own are pretty lousy. I'd really appreciate any veteran guidance on this. Thanks in advance!

Also, what's the best way to check that frequency once it's programmed?

Hi,
What application do you gave that needs a programmable PWM frequency?
You can measure the frequency with a frequency counter, an oscilloscope or a Digital Multimeter if it has a frequency range (Quite a few cheap ones have).
I gather the Micro has the same cpu as the Leonardo.

Tom… :slight_smile:
Just found this;

Hi, Please do not post more than one thread about the same question, it makes it hard for anyone to follow replies.

Tom...... :)

Thanks Tom. The posted link looks promising. The application is a toggle-able piezo disk affixed to a resonator to act as a synthetic jet for flow correction on a small UAV. The higher I get the triggering frequency, the smaller (and therefor lighter) I can design the resonator.